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-   -   Looking for good overview (book or paper) of standard model (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=10304)

davelee Dec4-03 10:48 PM

Looking for good overview (book or paper) of standard model
 
Hi all,
I've decided to read up on particle physics in my spare time for my own edification, but I've had some trouble locating a good textbook/survey paper with a succinct, technical and up-to-date description of the standard model. The text or two that i do have on hand were published in the 80's, and are woefully out of date (e.g. they postulate the existence of the top quark, rather than mention the actual discovery.)

Quick background on my technical level:
Did physics as an undergrad, studied Classical Mechanics, Basic QM (no QED, QCD), Thermo, E&M, vector analysis, etc.. Didn't take plasma, nuclear, General relativity, etc..
Also, ugly wavefunctions in all their multi-term glory don't scare me, but get tedious. Any pointers towards finding "big picture" books would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Ambitwistor Dec4-03 10:58 PM

Re: Looking for good overview (book or paper) of standard model
 
The book by Cottingham and Greenwood is good.

davelee Dec4-03 11:12 PM

Thanks, i'll check it out

suyver Dec5-03 05:22 AM

Halsen & Martin is a nice one too. Although it may already suffer from an excess of equationd for your interests...

mormonator_rm Dec5-03 04:13 PM

My personal favorite is the Physical Review. Its on the web at http://pdg.lbl.gov/. You can order the review there, too, but I forget how much it costs. It contains the best, most up-to-date version of the SM, if you are willing to sift through all of the technical terms and data. It is updated every year with the latest measurements in all areas of research.


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