Physics Forums

Physics Forums (http://www.physicsforums.com/index.php)
-   Academic Guidance (http://www.physicsforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=139)
-   -   Just got accepted to Uni! (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=173135)

ice109 Jun7-07 11:12 AM

Just got accepted to Uni!
 
and i have some questions. im coming in a transfer with an AA with maths through diff eq and both intro physics classes.

firstly is anyone familiar with honors in the major? for those that aren't it's basically an undergraduate thesis, it requires a defense and all that. would this be a good thing to do? besides personal benefit will it bolster my chances at a good grad school? i spoke with my intro physics teacher and he said that it is more important to get your name on a paper than to do this.

secondly i'm considering skipping all the undergrad classes that i can and taking the equivalent grad classes. besides the difficulty in getting something like this approved how stupid of an idea is this? like i said i've done all the calculus and diff eq and so i think the only class i'm lacking to be capable in those classes is linear algebra. basically the question is what are the differences between the undergrad classes and the grad, such as E&M and Classical mechanics?

thx

ZapperZ Jun7-07 11:29 AM

Quote:

Quote by ice109 (Post 1351281)
secondly i'm considering skipping all the undergrad classes that i can and taking the equivalent grad classes. besides the difficulty in getting something like this approved how stupid of an idea is this? like i said i've done all the calculus and diff eq and so i think the only class i'm lacking to be capable in those classes is linear algebra. basically the question is what are the differences between the undergrad classes and the grad, such as E&M and Classical mechanics?

thx

Do you know Lagrangian/Hamiltonian mechanics? If I give you a double pendulum (where one pendulum is attached to the bob of another pendulum), can you use a Lagrangian or Hamiltonian to find the equation of motion of the system?

Or what if I give you a hemisphere of charge and ask you to find the E-field along the axis of symmetry due to such charge distribution? If I have it spinning on that axis as some frequency, can you also find the magnetic field along that axis?

If you can't do any of these, then you need the undergraduate classes.

Zz.

Doc Al Jun7-07 11:31 AM

I'm a bit unclear as to what level you are at. Would you be entering the university as a freshman undergrad level?

G01 Jun7-07 01:49 PM

Take the undergrad courses. So what if you know the stuff? If so, they'll be easy A's, and if you realize you don't know the stuff well enough, well, then that's why your in the class!

ice109 Jun7-07 02:21 PM

Quote:

Quote by Doc Al (Post 1351296)
I'm a bit unclear as to what level you are at. Would you be entering the university as a freshman undergrad level?

im going to be taking 3000 level classes when i start at the uni

Doc Al Jun7-07 02:45 PM

Quote:

Quote by ice109 (Post 1351456)
im going to be taking 3000 level classes when i start at the uni

Sorry, but I don't understand that terminology.

What level are you right now? (In US terms: Are you in High School? College?)

Have you had university level undergrad courses already? Or do you just think you'd be gaining something by skipping the undergrad classes and substituting grad-level classes? (Why in the world would they let you do that?) If so, in my opinion: HUGE MISTAKE.

Unless you know that undergrad stuff inside and out, take the time and learn it right. Grad level classes will not usually waste time reviewing the basics--you will dive right in. If you are well beyond the average student in your mastery of the core curriculum--take advantage of that to really nail down the fine points while getting top grades. If you know that stuff cold you'll have plenty of time to dig into the details and master the tougher problems.

ice109 Jun7-07 04:01 PM

Quote:

Quote by Doc Al (Post 1351469)
Sorry, but I don't understand that terminology.

What level are you right now? (In US terms: Are you in High School? College?)

Have you had university level undergrad courses already? Or do you just think you'd be gaining something by skipping the undergrad classes and substituting grad-level classes? (Why in the world would they let you do that?) If so, in my opinion: HUGE MISTAKE.

Unless you know that undergrad stuff inside and out, take the time and learn it right. Grad level classes will not usually waste time reviewing the basics--you will dive right in. If you are well beyond the average student in your mastery of the core curriculum--take advantage of that to really nail down the fine points while getting top grades. If you know that stuff cold you'll have plenty of time to dig into the details and master the tougher problems.

i just got an AA, i'll be a junior in at this uni in the fall

symbolipoint Jun7-07 05:16 PM

ice109,

You could skip any courses for which you already earned credit; since your AA degree only gave you undergraduate courses, you may possibly skip those courses at the university. You will still need to attend the other undergraduate courses which are part of your degree program. You canNOT skip all of the undergrad. courses.

symbolipoint Jun7-07 05:21 PM

ice109,

Here is one more suggestion; in case any of your AA courses yielded you B or C grades, or if you think you did not learn enough from any one or more of them at the AA-granting institution, you may want to repeat a course AT THE UNIVERSITY since the equivalent course might be taught better, or differently, allowing you to gain more mastery than you had from the previous school.

I'm not suggesting you do this with most or all of your courses from the AA-granting school; only for one or two which you may need intense review from possibly a different professor.

ice109 Jun8-07 08:18 PM

so i just emailed around to some REUs and this is the responce i got from UC Davis, keep in mind i would like to do theory

Quote:

Quote by ucdavis
1) All projects: computer programming is a big plus.

2) Experimental projects: a particle physics class is a plus, but most
students haven't taken one. Upper-level quantum mechanics is all but a
requirement. Depending on the project, hands-on skills (machining,
electronics, or computer hardware) can help.

3) Theoretical projects: VERY strong math/physics coursework background is
expected. Although not required, some students have already completed
some of the relevant graduate-level courses in their junior years.


4) Grades: most of our students, in all fields, have GPAs over 3.8, but
each year a few have lower grades, down to about 3.0. That isn't a formal
cutoff but over the last four years I don't remember offering a spot to
anyone below that.

5) Past research: if you've done a previous REU or done research during
the schoolyear, get a letter from your advisor. A strong letter helps;
a weak or non-existent letter hurts.

Best wishes,
Rena Zieve
Associate Professor of Physics
University of California, Davis

so? obviously some people do do this? how do they do it? i can see taking cal 1-3 and diff eq at cc and then taking intro mechanics and intro e&m freshman year, then taking the intermediate analogues and then taking the graduate classes junior year. am i behind everyone else? am i too far behind to be competitive?:frown:

G01 Jun8-07 11:57 PM

Quote:

Quote by ice109 (Post 1352429)
so i just emailed around to some REUs and this is the responce i got from UC Davis, keep in mind i would like to do theory



so? obviously some people do do this? how do they do it? i can see taking cal 1-3 and diff eq at cc and then taking intro mechanics and intro e&m freshman year, then taking the intermediate analogues and then taking the graduate classes junior year. am i behind everyone else? am i too far behind to be competitive?:frown:

I honestly think thats going WAY over and beyond. You don't need to take graduate courses in your junior year to be successful in physics. But, hey, if you want to, go ahead. Personally, I'd rather take the classes as they come, gain a better understanding, instead of rushing.

michealsmith Jun22-07 11:59 AM

hey ...well done and good luck

ice109 Jun22-07 12:09 PM

whoah bump from the past


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:52 PM.

Powered by vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2014 Physics Forums