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-   -   Math trainer soft/freeware (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=183256)

Dissonance in E Sep6-07 02:01 PM

Math trainer soft/freeware
 
Hey, does anyone knwo of a program that can train you in different basic fields of mathematics, and preferrably keep track of performance statistics, so pin-pointing individual weaknesses would be easier?
I would find this kind of a program very useful and more motivating than simply going through problems in books.

Thanks.

chroot Sep6-07 02:13 PM

Do you know what would be even more motivating and useful to you? Writing your own such program. :smile:

- Warren

Dissonance in E Sep6-07 02:21 PM

I !WISH! I could do that. Btw, how hard is programming to learn. I would love to be able to grasp at least the basics of it. I had Netbeans on my other computer but I kind of lost interest in it as i had no idea what to do with it hahah...

chroot Sep6-07 02:23 PM

Well, let me ask: what level of math are you trying to test yourself on? Are we talking arithmetic, or calculus?

- Warren

Dissonance in E Sep6-07 02:48 PM

Mostly calc foundations and eventually (meaning pretty soon... meaning in a few weeks) basic calc.

chroot Sep6-07 03:16 PM

Have you considered simply getting a good book of problems? Schaum's outlines are great, and cheap.

- Warren

Dissonance in E Sep6-07 11:30 PM

Well like I said \, id be more keen to work with a program that can actually guide me through the material and keep track of progress, if such a program even exists.
However in the likely case of me not finding one, I'll probably end up getting a book. Does Schaum's book explain how to do the individual problems step by step? Im looking for something that REALLY breaks the problems down as i want to make sure I understand everything I need to...

VietDao29 Sep7-07 04:21 AM

Quote:

Quote by Dissonance in E (Post 1420723)
Well like I said \, id be more keen to work with a program that can actually guide me through the material and keep track of progress, if such a program even exists.

I may say, such programme is very very unlikely to exist. Games, and applicants are the 2 most common types of programmes. Training software is rare, you can find a Teach You How To type software easily. But, honestly, I haven't heard of this kind of Math-Training programme. :frown:

Quote:

However in the likely case of me not finding one, I'll probably end up getting a book. Does Schaum's book explain how to do the individual problems step by step? Im looking for something that REALLY breaks the problems down as i want to make sure I understand everything I need to...
Yup, books are good. :approve:

Most books will guide you through the concept, as well as, show you to do some basic examples step by step. Some may also show you the results of odd-numbered problems.

There are books that show you complete solutions to each problem. Well, I don't think they are good at all. You won't learn much from them. After all, you should do problem on your own, eh? If you stuck somewhere, you can always ask your prof, or PFers. :smile:

We are always willing to help you. :)

Dissonance in E Sep7-07 02:07 PM

Well i have Robert Adam's "Calculus: a complete course" with the addiional solution book with somewhat of a guidance through the problems. However I was hoping to solidify my pre calc before getting too into it. Anyhow ty for the answers. Il drop chuck some posts your way if i need help.
Thanks guys.

menager31 Sep10-07 03:29 PM

books never dies


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