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-   -   Independent Learning [relativity books] (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=242143)

sillydude Jun26-08 11:27 AM

Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
Hello everyone, summer break has begun for me, and I was wondering which way is the best possible way to learn new stuff over the summer, I wanted to dive into, and kind of begin, to have an understanding of Lorentz Transformations and Einstein's special relativity theory, is there any book or textbook in particular that you may recommend or any other means of acquiring this knowledge? or any advice on how to build up to the point (approaching different topics) where I can properly comprehend these theories...I'd also like to believe I have an aptitude for math and physics, so I'm not a TOTAL beginner :), I just finished grade 12.....Thanks in advance.

durt Jun26-08 02:07 PM

Re: Independent Learning
 
Perhaps Moore's A Traveler's Guide to Spacetime

sillydude Jun27-08 11:34 AM

Re: Independent Learning
 
Anything more in textbook format?

trinitron Jun27-08 01:26 PM

Re: Independent Learning
 
http://www.amazon.com/Special-Relati...4591104&sr=8-2

I haven't read this particular book but I've read another book by French (vibrations) and it was very good. This one seems to be well received.

jtbell Jun27-08 01:50 PM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
Taylor and Wheeler's "Spacetime Physics" is a very common recommendation for an introductory relativity textbook.

chroot Jun27-08 01:55 PM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
The Feynman Lectures on Physics contains a very direct introduction to special relativity.

- Warren

x3qt0r Jun27-08 03:39 PM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
as said by chroot feynman lectures on physics lectures 15 , 16 and 17.

and/or

special relativity --- robert resnick

Daverz Jun29-08 05:09 PM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
Get a copy of the first paperback edition of Spacetime Physics (not the newer second edition) and work through all the problems, only peeking at the solutions in the back when you get totally stuck.

http://www.amazon.com/Spacetime-Phys.../dp/071670336X

will.c Jun30-08 12:34 PM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
I second French.

durt Jul1-08 04:12 AM

Re: Independent Learning
 
Quote:

Quote by durt (Post 1780418)
Perhaps Moore's A Traveler's Guide to Spacetime

This is a textbook. More textbooky than Spacetime Physics.

sillydude Jul2-08 01:26 PM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
Thank you for all your help.

Varnick Jul7-08 07:53 AM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
I'm currently self-teaching SR and GR also, and I would heartily recommend "Relativity Demystified", it may only contain one chapter on special relativity, but it is excellently written (in my opinion) and good if you want to challenge yourself and look at some GR.

V

Domnu Jul9-08 08:51 AM

Re: Independent Learning [relativity books]
 
Hmm... I'm trying to do the same, actually :) How exactly is "A Traveler's Guide to Spacetime" structured? Is it like Halliday and Resnick with their Foundations of Physics textbook?


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