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-   -   What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment? (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=256005)

DarkStalker Sep13-08 02:40 PM

What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
First of all, I'd like you people to know that I'm a 10th grader. So yes, silly questions may follow.

As the topic says, I want to have an idea of what the 'extra dimensions', that might possibly be discovered in the LHC experiment according to the CERN report, really are.

-Are those something like "Parallel universes", the things we see in comics and sci-fi stuff? Different people, or our doubles, living in the same space, which is not actually the same. Is it something -roughly- like that?

I tried to google it but most of the stuff there just went right over my head. Also, I request you to be as simple as possible, as I'm yet learning the basics.

Oberst Villa Sep13-08 03:26 PM

Re: What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
The extra dimensions, should they exist, are not part of another universe. They belong to our universe, though we are not able to see or percieve them (that's all I understand about them, sorry...)

By the way, the "parallel universes" are not only a concept of science fiction. Respectable physicists have thought about them, in the context of an interpretation of quantum mechanics:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Many-worlds_interpretation Don't feel bad if you can't understand all that stuff, neither can I. Just wanted to show you that people are seriously thinking about it. However, it is just a theory, and it will probably never be possible to prove it, so don't get too excited about it.

DarkStalker Sep13-08 06:58 PM

Re: What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
Quote:

Quote by Oberst Villa (Post 1871890)
The extra dimensions, should they exist, are not part of another universe. They belong to our universe, though we are not able to see or perceive them (that's all I understand about them, sorry...)

I see. So basically the total 'space' is the same, inside which there are multiple worlds. Wow, this stuff has to be complicated. I can't even find words to describe it. Matter that's somehow hidden from our view, doesn't occupy space, yet exists in the same place?

Quote:

By the way, the "parallel universes" are not only a concept of science fiction. Respectable physicists have thought about them, in the context of an interpretation of quantum mechanics
Now that was exactly what I was looking for. I can't imagine something so fictitious actually having substance in it.
But when you say 'respectable scientists' you imply that that the majority either doesn't believe in it or has some alternative to this theory. Correct me if I'm wrong.

Quote:

Don't feel bad if you can't understand all that stuff, neither can I. Just wanted to show you that people are seriously thinking about it.
Yeah, but it would've been much more convenient if you could just look up Wiki and understand everything in first read. :(
And scientists actually believing this concept is indeed news to me.

Quote:

However, it is just a theory, and it will probably never be possible to prove it, so don't get too excited about it.
Okay, you just gave me a reason NOT to be excited about the LHC experiment. X(
But regardless, such an interesting concept not being refuted is good enough for me.

A/4 Sep14-08 11:32 AM

Re: What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
Quote:

Quote by DarkStalker (Post 1872102)
I see. So basically the total 'space' is the same, inside which there are multiple worlds. Wow, this stuff has to be complicated. I can't even find words to describe it. Matter that's somehow hidden from our view, doesn't occupy space, yet exists in the same place?

The "extra dimensions" are simply extra dimensions of space, in addition to the usual three (x,y,z). There are a few differences, though. First, they are not "straight" dimensions, but are curled up into tiny circles. Second, only gravity can enter these extra dimensions. Light and other particles can't, which is why we can't readily see them.

Quote:

Okay, you just gave me a reason NOT to be excited about the LHC experiment. X(
But regardless, such an interesting concept not being refuted is good enough for me.
Don't lose your enthusiasm! IF the LHC finds evidence that extra dimensions really exist, that would be the most exciting result possible to come out of the experiment! The other expected results -- finding the Higgs boson, or possibly supersymmetry -- will merely show us that new particles exist. But finding extra dimensions would radically alter our concept of the universe. You can't help but be excited about that!

Hurkyl Sep14-08 12:10 PM

Re: What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
Quote:

Quote by Oberst Villa (Post 1871890)
By the way, the "parallel universes" are not only a concept of science fiction. Respectable physicists have thought about them, in the context of an interpretation of quantum mechanics:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Many-worlds_interpretation

Quote:

Quote by DarkStalker (Post 1872102)
Now that was exactly what I was looking for. I can't imagine something so fictitious actually having substance in it.

The MWI doesn't talk about sci-fi-style parallel universes; the similarities are only superficial (although probably the origin of the terminology).

Seiryuu Sep14-08 02:22 PM

Re: What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
Quote:

Quote by A/4 (Post 1872987)
The "extra dimensions" are simply extra dimensions of space, in addition to the usual three (x,y,z). There are a few differences, though. First, they are not "straight" dimensions, but are curled up into tiny circles. Second, only gravity can enter these extra dimensions. Light and other particles can't, which is why we can't readily see them.

Untill the nature of those dimensions and the nature of gravity can be discovered, that remains speculation though

Quote:

Quote by A/4 (Post 1872987)
But finding extra dimensions would radically alter our concept of the universe. You can't help but be excited about that!

Or maybe finding extra dimensions confirms our concept of the universe instead of altering it ;)

Either way, it is indeed exciting stuff ^^

George Jones Sep14-08 04:56 PM

Re: What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
Quote:

Quote by Hurkyl (Post 1873019)
The MWI doesn't talk about sci-fi-style parallel universes; the similarities are only superficial (although probably the origin of the terminology).

Many cosmologists and string theorists maintain that the MWI applies to superpositions of universes.

dlgoff Sep14-08 05:01 PM

Re: What are the "Extra Dimensions" in the LHC experiment?
 
You might want to take a look at this thread on Curled up dimensions


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