Physics Forums

Physics Forums (http://www.physicsforums.com/index.php)
-   Career Guidance (http://www.physicsforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=193)
-   -   Difference between Applied Science and Engineering? (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=412822)

Shackleford Jun27-10 10:54 AM

Difference between Applied Science and Engineering?
 
I always thought engineering is applied science, but a guy at work says no - engineering is a part of applied science. Applied science seeks to apply pure science or discover where it can be applied. So, I'm just wondering what all the nuances are. He said I seem like an Applied Science guy.

Shackleford Jun28-10 07:53 PM

Re: Difference between Applied Science and Engineering?
 
Maybe this was a stupid question. lol.

Academic Jun28-10 07:57 PM

Re: Difference between Applied Science and Engineering?
 
Maybe a difference could be that applied science does research, but research with an application (engineering, medicine, etc). 'Regular' science does research with no application in mind, its just to discover phenomenon and model observations. Engineering is not about research, its about using ideas and models that are already known to construct something.

In practice, it can be pretty hard to differentiate between those fields.

Shackleford Jun28-10 08:04 PM

Re: Difference between Applied Science and Engineering?
 
Quote:

Quote by Academic (Post 2779617)
Maybe a difference could be that applied science does research, but research with an application (engineering, medicine, etc). 'Regular' science does research with no application in mind, its just to discover phenomenon and model observations. Engineering is not about research, its about using ideas and models that are already known to construct something.

In practice, it can be pretty hard to differentiate between those fields.

Yeah. Okay. Applied science is a different flavor of research - application-oriented research. I certainly understand what engineering is. You create something specific that has never been made before. I think the guy at work is right. His background is physics, ret. Lt. Col. USMC, NASA, etc. I always enjoy talking with him about a number of topics (science, politics, history, etc.) since our interests are similar. After I finish my Physics BS in a couple of years, I'll hopefully start graduate school and a career in something that has yet to be determined.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:51 AM.

Powered by vBulletin Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
© 2014 Physics Forums