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-   -   Self-taught computer science/engineering curriculum? (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=472505)

kcaco10 Feb13-11 04:01 PM

Self-taught computer science/engineering curriculum?
 
Hello all,

I am not sure if formal introductions are required on this forum, but my name is Chris and I have degrees in physics and mechanical engineering. My current job is unrelated to these fields, but I hope to get an engineering-related job soon.

In any event, I have been antsy lately to exercise my mind and advance my knowledge of computer science and engineering. Specifically, I would like to learn both the physical and theoretical basis of computers, learn about software and hardware, and coding and programming as well. I took some EE and logic courses in college, and of course calc and diff eqs, which may help a bit. I was hoping that someone could recommend a self-taught program and some good books to help along the way.

TylerH Feb13-11 04:14 PM

Re: Self-taught computer science/engineering curriculum?
 
What language/paradigm do you want to learn the most? And more importantly, what do you want to do with what you learn?

kcaco10 Feb13-11 04:23 PM

Re: Self-taught computer science/engineering curriculum?
 
I suppose I am interested in process-oriented programming...I am more interested in learning how computers operate and how to build programs to assist in solving problems rather than for the purpose of developing games, applications, etc.

TylerH Feb13-11 04:47 PM

Re: Self-taught computer science/engineering curriculum?
 
I don't know what process oriented programing is. Is it something like multiprocessing or something? If it is, multiprocessing can usually be achieved in any language, given the APIs. I would suggest you learn something like C or C++, because of how ubiquitous they are.

If you're interested in problem solving for the sake of learning, you may want to try Project Euler. A whole site of problems to be solved with programming.

What do you mean by solving problems? What's an example of a problem you would like to solve?

Learning programming isn't going to teach you much about hardware though. A lot of people confuse computer engineering with computer science, when, in fact, they are two very separate fields.


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