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-   -   Ansys: Heat due to Friction (http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=540344)

grt1710 Oct14-11 01:22 PM

Ansys: Heat due to Friction
 
I am doing my B.Tech Project on Finite Element Analysis. I need to generate the following thing in Ansys - One body slides over another and due to friction, heat is generated.


Can anyone please help me out how to do that?
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



2. Relevant equations



3. The attempt at a solution

LawrenceC Oct14-11 01:39 PM

Re: Ansys: Heat due to Friction
 
If you have a stationary object and another is rubbed on it heat is generated. The heat generated equals the work done. The work in ft-lbs can be directly equated to BTU's by dividing the ft-lbs by 778. The work done is frictional force times distance.

Don't know if this answers your question.

grt1710 Oct14-11 01:47 PM

Re: Ansys: Heat due to Friction
 
Hi Lawrence,

That is true but that is not what I am looking for. I need someone to explain the procedure to simulate this in Ansys. I am trying a lot in vain. Please help me out :(

LawrenceC Oct14-11 01:54 PM

Re: Ansys: Heat due to Friction
 
Unfortunately in my career with a chemical company, I did not use ANSYS. So I am afraid I cannot help you. I did a considerable amount of work with FE but it was in the area of heat transfer and stress analysis. For stress problems I used NASTRAN and SDRC softwares.

On the lighter side, objects sliding on one another and heating is frowned upon in the chemical industry.

Hopefully you can find an instruction manual for ANSYS. It is very powerful software.

grt1710 Oct16-11 05:37 AM

Re: Ansys: Heat due to Friction
 
Oh okay.
If someone can please explain me a detailed procedure of doing the problem in vm229 (verification manual) of Ansys 11 or 12, it will be really helpful.
Please help me out friends! :(


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