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Tanarif Apr1-12 08:10 PM

Maths in Computer Science?
 
As a person learning calculus, I always get frustrated by considering the practical applications of it. In an interview Larry Ellison said this about relational database programming:

"Relational database technology was invented by a guy by the name of Ted Codd at IBM. It's based on relational algebra and relational calculus. It is a very mathematically rigorous form of data management that we can prove mathematically to be functionally complete."

Could someone possibly explain or direct me towards where I can find out precisely how databases can be linked to calculus/maths?

Any input is much appreciated.
Thanks

Number Nine Apr1-12 08:32 PM

Re: Maths in Computer Science?
 
He is referring to to a different kind of calculus than the field you're thinking of. Googling either of the terms you listed will find you a definition, which will go a long way towards describing their applications in CS. Beyond that, you won't be able to do much without a background in logic.

Tanarif Apr1-12 08:47 PM

Re: Maths in Computer Science?
 
Quote:

Quote by Number Nine (Post 3845516)
He is referring to to a different kind of calculus than the field you're thinking of. Googling either of the terms you listed will find you a definition, which will go a long way towards describing their applications in CS. Beyond that, you won't be able to do much without a background in logic.

Thanks, will do so. Just to quickly ask, do you refer to a specific study of logic, or just logic in a more general sense?

romsofia Apr2-12 04:55 PM

Re: Maths in Computer Science?
 
For computer science, you deal with a branch called Boolean Algebra. This study is VERY important because, without it, we wouldn't even have logic gates!

I don't know where you're at in your math/CS journey, so I'll leave you with the wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boolean_algebra_(logic)

Good luck.

Number Nine Apr2-12 05:12 PM

Re: Maths in Computer Science?
 
Quote:

Quote by Tanarif (Post 3845539)
Thanks, will do so. Just to quickly ask, do you refer to a specific study of logic, or just logic in a more general sense?

Definitely the formal study of logic. Unfortunately, logic courses (beyond simple introductions) tend to be rare at most Universities.

rcgldr Apr2-12 05:54 PM

Re: Maths in Computer Science?
 
Relational algebra is different than boolean algebra. Wiki articles (some unicode symbols in the articles show up as square blocks on my browser, I'm not sure what font set is needed to see all of them):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_algebra

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_calculus

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuple_relational_calculus

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_relational_calculus

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_model

SteveL27 Apr2-12 09:22 PM

Re: Maths in Computer Science?
 
Quote:

Quote by Tanarif (Post 3845477)
As a person learning calculus, I always get frustrated by considering the practical applications of it. In an interview Larry Ellison said this about relational database programming:

"Relational database technology was invented by a guy by the name of Ted Codd at IBM. It's based on relational algebra and relational calculus. It is a very mathematically rigorous form of data management that we can prove mathematically to be functionally complete."

Could someone possibly explain or direct me towards where I can find out precisely how databases can be linked to calculus/maths?

Any input is much appreciated.
Thanks


Relational databases are based on relations in set theory. A relation is a subset of the Cartesian product of a collection of sets. You can define all relational database operations in terms of operations on set theoretic relations.


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