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Niles Dec26-12 03:34 PM

Transmission coefficient
 
Hi

I have a question on the transmission coefficient in classical optics. When we say that a medium has a transmittance of e.g. 99%, then 99% of the incident light intensity is transmitted. But will the light also acquire a phase?

I tried searching the web, but all I found was this Wiki-article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propagation_constant. There it states that the propagation constant has an imaginary term (=phase), but does it also apply to the case I described?

Best,
Niles.

mfb Dec26-12 04:42 PM

Re: Transmission coefficient
 
If just the transmittance is given, I don't see a way to determine the phase shift (if present).

andrien Dec27-12 03:12 AM

Re: Transmission coefficient
 
the phases of light(incident,reflected,transmitted) at the point where it strikes must be equal.it induces some phase relationship for these waves.


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