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Electric Field

by That_0ne_Guy
Tags: electric, field
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That_0ne_Guy
#1
Dec23-03, 05:20 PM
P: 2
I'm a high school senior interested in completing a science project. I'm wondering what knowledge is necessary for me to understand the interaction between coherent light( like a laser) and a uniform electric field with the ultimate goal of constructing a model. The project will be a type of optics demonstration, but this one aspect is a giving me trouble.
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arcnets
#2
Dec24-03, 05:24 PM
P: 513
Well the standard answer is that two electromagnetic fields superimpose (i.e., add) without influencing each other. In layman's language, one beam of light will go right through another beam of light without any interaction. Same for static fields.
speso72
#3
Dec26-03, 12:49 PM
P: 28
They will pass through one another as long as their wavelengths are not in exact phase with one another. It is difficult to achive exact phasing of wavelengths from two (or more) sources, however, it can happen. If they are in phase with one another, they will try and cancel each other out, usually resulting in some sort of static interferance or noise. The wavelength with the most power will usually win.

speso72
#4
Dec26-03, 05:29 PM
P: 28
Electric Field

After rereading my reply, I realized I made a mistake. I said in it "as long as their wavelengths are not in exact phase with one another" when I should have said ' as long as their wavelengths are not in exact oposite phase with one another'.

Sorry about the mixup. I tend to get backwards at times.

If the wavelengths are exactly out of phase with one another, then they will try and cancel each other out.

Think Safe.
pallidin
#5
Dec27-03, 06:20 PM
P: 2,292
Two beams of light interacting with each other? I thought the question was with regards to a coherent light source interacting with an electric field.
The coherent light will bend in the presence of a strong electric field.
wbeaty
#6
Jan7-04, 01:42 AM
P: 116
Originally posted by pallidin
Two beams of light interacting with each other? I thought the question was with regards to a coherent light source interacting with an electric field.
The coherent light will bend in the presence of a strong electric field.
Not in any electric field humans can produce! But wouldn't it be cool if we could make lens systems out of nothing but vacuum and radio waves.
mighty2000
#7
Jan7-04, 11:27 AM
P: 39
whould this be possible with an extremely large gradient on the nth order of light? The longer wavelengths would react less, while the shorter wavelengths would react more.

M2k


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