HD Vision WrapArounds


by Greg Bernhardt
Tags: vision, wraparounds
Greg Bernhardt
Greg Bernhardt is offline
#1
Jun3-08, 03:00 PM
Admin
Greg Bernhardt's Avatar
P: 8,536
These are sunglasses that claim to give you HD vision (whatever that means) and enchance your vision. Just saw a TV ad for them and it was ridiculous. How anyone could actually be inticed to buy these pieces of junk is beyond me. One lady in the ad claims they look like designer glasses, when really they look down right silly.

https://www.hdwraparounds.com
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Going nuts? Turkey looks to pistachios to heat new eco-city
Space-tested fluid flow concept advances infectious disease diagnoses
SpaceX launches supplies to space station (Update)
K.J.Healey
K.J.Healey is offline
#2
Jun3-08, 03:23 PM
P: 640
Looks like they:
Decrease brightness/filter.
Encase your eyes so your pupils adjust to the lower light amount. (any leakage and these would seem like normal sunglasses.)
This = Less washed out colors from it being too bright out, but your eyes compensate for the low intensity.
Seems like at most they may increase color depth, but no way does it have anything to do with HD.
mcknia07
mcknia07 is offline
#3
Jun4-08, 04:43 PM
mcknia07's Avatar
P: 320
They so don't look designer, that's for sure....

NoTime
NoTime is offline
#4
Jun4-08, 06:37 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 1,572

HD Vision WrapArounds


They probably work well with the DVD Rewinder
turbo
turbo is offline
#5
Jun4-08, 06:47 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,367
These look like the cheesy cheap sunglasses that ophthalmologists dole out to old folks after cataract surgery. Anybody who has a clue about physiology and optics knows that decreasing the amount of light to your eyes results in pupil dilation, with exacerbates all the optical defects in your eyes' lenses. If you are in bright light and are nearsighted with astigmatism (as I am) you will see WAY better than if you are wearing sunglasses or are in a dimly-lit environment.

AS an ABO-certified optician, I used to consult with patients regarding coatings, tinting, etc, of the glasses that I made for them, and it's WAY more complex than these cheesy ads portray.
Moonbear
Moonbear is offline
#6
Jun5-08, 06:45 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Moonbear's Avatar
P: 12,257
Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
These look like the cheesy cheap sunglasses that ophthalmologists dole out to old folks after cataract surgery.
They do!

They have amber lenses. That particular color does make things appear brighter. I've encountered that color (in a more stylish version) in my trials of sunglasses over the years, and my experience was it was also pretty crappy for functioning as sunglasses...I'd still be squinting in the sunlight when wearing them.
turbo
turbo is offline
#7
Jun5-08, 06:54 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,367
Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
They do!

They have amber lenses. That particular color does make things appear brighter. I've encountered that color (in a more stylish version) in my trials of sunglasses over the years, and my experience was it was also pretty crappy for functioning as sunglasses...I'd still be squinting in the sunlight when wearing them.
I have used amber shooting glasses from Busch and Lomb and they are OK. I would recommend clear or lightly-tinted lenses with good UV coatings for anybody who spends a lot of time outdoors or on the water. They allow enough light to your eyes to constrict your pupils (good for sharper vision and restriction of UV to the interior of the eye) and the additional coatings cut the UV even more.
mgb_phys
mgb_phys is offline
#8
Jun5-08, 07:11 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
P: 8,961
Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
II would recommend clear or lightly-tinted lenses with good UV coatings for anybody who spends a lot of time outdoors or on the water.
Isn't polycarbonate pretty much dead below 400nm, do UV coatings really do much on plastic lenses?
Moonbear
Moonbear is offline
#9
Jun5-08, 08:13 PM
Emeritus
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Moonbear's Avatar
P: 12,257
Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
I have used amber shooting glasses from Busch and Lomb and they are OK. I would recommend clear or lightly-tinted lenses with good UV coatings for anybody who spends a lot of time outdoors or on the water. They allow enough light to your eyes to constrict your pupils (good for sharper vision and restriction of UV to the interior of the eye) and the additional coatings cut the UV even more.
What's the point of clear lenses? No thanks, I think I'll stick with ones that would actually allow me to open my eyes outdoors, that's the point of sunglasses.
turbo
turbo is offline
#10
Jun5-08, 08:38 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,367
Quote Quote by Moonbear View Post
What's the point of clear lenses? No thanks, I think I'll stick with ones that would actually allow me to open my eyes outdoors, that's the point of sunglasses.
Sunglasses are great if they are properly designed. If they are cheap glasses that attenuate visible light without attenuating UV, they will harm your eyes. Your eyes have evolved to dilate in the absence of light and to contract is an excess of light. The problem with this simple evolutionary model is that reducing the visible light to the eye results in more-open irises and more exposure to UV damage to the eyes. I am not an ophthalmologist, but I worked for a very large consortium of them and built their public presentations so that they could make their cases to optometrists and the general public.
mesocyclone
mesocyclone is offline
#11
Jun16-08, 08:59 PM
P: 1
For a couple of years, I have used a "advertised on TV" type of sunglasses, and I love them. They are brown/amber and fit over my regular glasses. The brown color highlights colors by blocking blue, but is not as harsh as yellow "blue blockers" so the overall effect is pleasant. If you have never tried glasses of this shade outdoors, you might be surprised at how good the effect is.

I used these both for sun shade and for watching clouds when storm chasing.

As for UV protection, my regular clear prescription glasses provide those.

The "HD Wraparounds" appear to be similar to what I have. If so, for some people, they will indeed be a useful product.
Evo
Evo is offline
#12
Jun16-08, 10:18 PM
Mentor
Evo's Avatar
P: 25,939
Thre best sunglasses I've ever had were a pair of prescription glasses with polarized lenses. They were a dark purple that looked almost black, but didn't make things look dark. I quite often forgot that I had them on when I went indoors.

The amazing thing about them were how they made colors so vibrant. I've never seen grass so green. Everything just looked so much more beautiful with them on. The dog ate them. I hope I can find another optometrist that knows what made them so unique. You can't buy anything like them over the counter that I've found.
Mech_Engineer
Mech_Engineer is offline
#13
Jun18-08, 01:55 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Mech_Engineer's Avatar
P: 2,234
  • Enhance your vision
  • Just like High Definition TV
If your vision is "just like" an HDTV, its pretty horrible. This is one of many products that plays on the B.S. catch phrase of the year, "High Definition." If it isn't HD, it must be crap!!!
Cherylyn
Cherylyn is offline
#14
Jun22-08, 01:05 PM
P: 5
I have Saltzman's Nodular Degeneration, something about bluish gray nodules floating around in my eyes, I'm obviously not a doctor, but my biggest issue is glare. My glasses are transitional lenses, they have anti-glare, are polarized, whatever can be incorporated in a pair of glasses is there. I also have prescription sunglasses that I use when driving, and they help, but the glare is STILL a problem.

I was going to try these "HD Wrao Arounds" since they fit over my regular glasses, and they are only 20.00, so even if they help a little, hey, I'll go for it.

From what I've been told, Saltzman's is somewhat rare, and my current doctor really doesn't know how to treat it, so he just sees my every 3 months or so, and I've been using steroid eye drops for several years, so I feel like I'm on my own here. I'll take whatever help I can get.
turbo
turbo is offline
#15
Jun22-08, 03:05 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,367
If you have been properly diagnosed, you have small nodules growing on your cornea - the outer surface of the eye. They can be surgically removed to re-establish proper curvature and restore good vision. You should talk to your doctor about this.
WarPhalange
WarPhalange is offline
#16
Jun22-08, 07:05 PM
P: 343
What would happen if you wore those while watching TV in HD? Would your eyes just melt from the clear picture?
turbo
turbo is offline
#17
Jun22-08, 07:23 PM
PF Gold
turbo's Avatar
P: 7,367
Quote Quote by WarPhalange View Post
What would happen if you wore those while watching TV in HD? Would your eyes just melt from the clear picture?
Yes! I had a '65 Jeep CJ5 and I loved JC Whitney. I bought all the fuel-saving devices they offered, and I had to stop every 20 miles or so to siphon the extra gas out of the tank so it wouldn't overflow. That was a pain in the a$$. Had to get rid of the Jeep because it was too small to carry the gas-cans.
Cherylyn
Cherylyn is offline
#18
Jun22-08, 09:37 PM
P: 5
Quote Quote by turbo-1 View Post
If you have been properly diagnosed, you have small nodules growing on your cornea - the outer surface of the eye. They can be surgically removed to re-establish proper curvature and restore good vision. You should talk to your doctor about this.
I'm pretty confident about the diagnosis, it came from a doctor at Doheny Eye Instute here in Los Angeles, he's a corneal specialist, and I had confidence in him.

If you'll bear with me, I'll give you my story, as briefly as I can. Since I've got your 'ear', LOL.

Unfortunately, I belong to a Blue Cross HMO. The whole thing started because my very astute optometrist wrote me a note that said she suspected some kind of Keratitas(sp?) she told me to give the note to my primary physician, which I did, after several months I rec'vd a referral to the ophthalmologist that is part of the HMO. He took a look, said he thought the optometrist was right, and he said it was 'very unusual' and he felt I'd qualify to see the specialist, due to the rarity. After several more months I rec'vd the referral to see Dr. Song at Doheny Eye Institute. He had some impressive equipment, anyway, he immediately diagnosed it as Saltzman's. He said there were several options, the first being steroid eye drops "Alrex". I followed up 3 months later, the nodules looked much better, they were gathering together into one and I had marked improvement, but they didn't disappear. I followed up a few more times, and while there was no more improvement, they didn't get any worse. I was expecting to go on to another option, instead Blue Cross declined the next follow-up, and sent me back to the original ophthalmologist. I liked that doctor, but he was of advanced age, and felt some of the options, like surgery were too extreme, he told me it wouldn't get better, that his goal was to make me comfortable. I didn't get a vote. He retired a few years later, and I rec'vd a letter that a new ophthalmologist was under contract, I've been seeing that one for the past year. I told him I had conflicting opinions on the course of treatment, and asked him what he thought, he literally shrugged. He said to continue the Alrex, and follow up every 3 months. They've taken lots of pictures of my eyes, but haven't told me what to expect, or what my options were, nothing. Until my last visit. I told him the glare problem was worse, I noticed a decline in my vision, and that my eyes felt more strained lately after working on the computer. He told me the nodules looked about the same, that it might be normal fluctuations. However, I did tell him it was getting to be more of a problem, so he said 'let me take a look at the surrounding tissue. Then he said well you 'have a couple of small cataracts' WHAT??? !!?? I said 'isn't that really bad?' 'something very elderly people get?' I'm 48, not young, bit I will need my eyes for many years to come, I'm a Teacher Librarian. He said no, everybody has them, it's like a wrinkle. But you know, I remember the other doctor saying the Alrex might possibly cause cataracts. He also said the nodules are getting closer to the pupil. Then, out of the blue, he said "We might have to consider a corneal transplant'....uh, let's just say I was shocked, since he had been pretty laid back and unconcerned in the past. I told him the Doheny Doctor had said there were options, including surgical removal, he said "oh, I can write another referral, if you'd like' well, needless to say, I very much wanted that, he wrote the referral, and I'm now waiting to see if Blue Cross will approve it.


To his credit the current ophthalmologist, had prescribed Restasis to combat the dry eye associated with Salzman's, and, of course, Blue Cross declined the prescription. The last time I saw him was Friday, and he now had samples, so he gave me a month's supply, I've been using them twice a day like he said. So...there you have it, another HMO nightmare. and here I am, looking into HD Wraparounds...


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Machine vision/computer vision/Image processing forums ? Programming & Computer Science 5
Improving Vision Biology 2
color vision Biology 7
persistence of vision... General Physics 4
3d vision General Discussion 4