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A ghost story.

by Ivan Seeking
Tags: ghost, story
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Tom McCurdy
#19
Jun14-04, 03:20 PM
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God not equal possible with physics
ghosts oh yeah I have had contact with those


...
zoobyshoe
#20
Jun14-04, 04:11 PM
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Regarding music from nowhere: this is a fairly decent summary of a piece by Neurologist Oliver Sacks. The book, The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat is available just about everywhere, including librarys, and is a fascinating read.

*
"Musical Epilepsy...
Have you ever wondered what it would be like to hear your favorite song all day and all night on your own personal radio...IN YOUR HEAD! The chapter called "Reminiscences" in Oliver Sacks's book, The Man Who Mistook his Wife for a Hat, discusses a few cases where people have actually experienced musical epilepsy so to speak. One woman, Mrs. O'C, woke up one night to Irish music playing loudly. She figured someone had left a radio on, but she soon discovered that she was the only one hearing the music. When she went to see Dr. Sacks, he had difficulty speaking with her because the music was too loud. Only during the quieter songs could she hear him. After an EEG, it was evident that Mrs. O'C was having temporal lobe seizures and this was causing the 'reminiscence' or 'experiential hallucination'. The sudden onset of songs in the middle of the night was due to a stroke, and as it resolved so did the songs as she experienced less and less music in her head.

"Usually when we are told that someone has had a stroke, we expect that the person could be severly hindered in their abilities to communicate and/or function physically. But this woman had the good fortune of being affected in the "musical" part of the brain, the temporal lobes. While sometimes this music could also be dehabilitating in terms of communication, she did not lose any cognitive functions and her motor skills were fine. I would say that she was pretty lucky.

"While Mrs. O'C's bouts of music eventually lessened until they disappeared all together, another woman, Mrs. O'M had the same symptoms only they got worse over time. Her songs of choice were church songs, always the same three songs. She was experiencing seizures also in the temporal lobe, and to calm them down, Dr. Sacks put her on anticonvulsants.

"One more interesting story is that of Shostakovich, a composer, who was found to have a metallic splinter in his head which pressed against his temporal lobe when he tilted his head to one side. He would hear melodies which were different each time which he would then incorporate into his compositions. The difference between this case and the two women mentioned above, is that while their songs were always the same which is common among epileptic hallucinations, his melodies were always different. This indicates that it must have been a different location on the temporal lobe that was being stimulated in his case. It makes you wonder that if the metal chip was moved over a millimeter, would he be hearing Oh, Susana over and over and over? And would he still be a composer?"

Address:http://www.macalester.edu/~psych/wha...ra/diary6.html Changed:12:32 PM on Wednesday, August 5, 1998

In that chapter Sacks references the work of Neurologist Wilder Pennfield who localized the processing of music to the temporal lobe of the right hemisphere. Pennfield could actually induce the hearing of music that wasn't there by stimulating parts of this area in the brains of epileptics. (He did this as a side experiment when their heads were open already anyway for surgery, and as part of the seizure focus location process).

(Something that is interesting is that it also can work the other way: music can trigger seizures. This is a form of reflex epilepsy in which seizures are triggered by outside stimulations. It generally indicates that the seizure focus is located near where that stimulus is normally proessed anyway.)
JohnDubYa
#21
Jun14-04, 11:25 PM
P: 1,322
With my luck I would hear Billy Joel all day (until I put a bullet in my brain).
Ivan Seeking
#22
Jun14-04, 11:50 PM
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Quote Quote by zoobyshoe
"One more interesting story is that of Shostakovich, a composer, who was found to have a metallic splinter in his head which pressed against his temporal lobe when he tilted his head to one side...He would hear melodies
The inspiration for the music box?

He would hear melodies which were different each time which he would then incorporate into his compositions.
Now that is quite interesting. From where did the melodies come? The chance of constructing music as we may dreams seems unlikely - ie. by attempting to serialize [make sense] of random impulses recieved from the brain stem. Just as our dreams can be nonsensical, so would a random music composition. It would seem that he must have constructed these melodies in some sense but was completely unaware of doing so. .
Ivan Seeking
#23
Jun14-04, 11:59 PM
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Zooby you know, this reminds me a bit of my experience of being hynotized and "past life regressed". You may remember that for most of the experience I was producing these false memories - stories of sorts that mostly made sense but that my brain seemingly created without my thinking or effort to do so. Perhaps some people can do the same sort of thing with music.
zoobyshoe
#24
Jun15-04, 12:00 AM
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I'm glad you noticed that. In the case of the two women, of course, the music was coming from their memories, but in the case of Shostokovich it was apparently being composed on the spot.

Unless someone else with this same freak condition could be found and studied with todays scanning technologies, I don't think there's any chance of figuring out what was going on.
zoobyshoe
#25
Jun15-04, 12:13 AM
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Yes, alot of the great composers and performers could improvise music on the spot: Bach, Mozart, Beethoven.

In Shostokovich's case this seemed to be triggered by the movement of the splinter, and translated to an auditory hallucination at the same time. Quite peculiar.
Michaelpol
#26
Jun23-04, 10:31 AM
P: 23
I have encountered a ghost before. Me and my mom and dad we're driving home one late night. We passed by A cemetary and we saw this girl walking her face was all covered in black wearing a white gown. Later on We saw this girl yet again but this time my dad got out and went up to the girl. She told him where she lived and her name. Then she told him to not go back to his house. He ran back to the car and we sped off. When we got home The Lights were on in the house for some reason. We went in and then there was a noise in the garage. So my dad sent me out to get his gun out of the car. I got his gun and gave it to him. He slowly went to the garage i was following him with my baseball bat. We went into the garage and there was a man in the garage my dad got injured and the burglar got killed. Next day me and my mom went over to the girls house. But she wasnt there. Her mom was. We asked if she was there and she said she wasnt that she had been dead for 10 years. So then we believed in ghosts and to heed their words.
TenNen
#27
Jun23-04, 01:05 PM
P: 109
This sounds like a scary movie
zoobyshoe
#28
Jun23-04, 08:33 PM
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First Dowser501, now Michaelpol.
Michaelpol
#29
Jun24-04, 02:31 PM
P: 23
Not a movie really happened


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