How much Gamma Radiation does Radium produce


by Kalrag
Tags: gamma, radiation, radium, rays
Kalrag
Kalrag is offline
#1
Nov3-10, 09:22 AM
P: 100
Alright, Ive confirmed that Radium produces Gamma rays. But how much does it put off? Is it a really high level or a tolerable level that can be stopped.
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NobodySpecial
NobodySpecial is offline
#2
Nov3-10, 10:38 AM
P: 474
Most of the danger is from alpha decay, the gamma are lower energy but travel further.

Your question is really two parts. The danger of gamma rays comes from their intensity - how much radioactive stuff there is and how much gamma it emits - therefore how many gamma photons you are going to receive. Gamma radiation at any energy is harmful so there isn't a huge health difference with energy.
How easy it is to stop does depend on the energy

see http://www.evs.anl.gov/pub/doc/Radium.pdf
RocketSci5KN
RocketSci5KN is offline
#3
Nov3-10, 03:48 PM
P: 157
The danger from any alpha particle emitter is only if you get it inside the body. They are harmless external to the body. Gamma's are best attenuated by high Z materials, say depleted U or Pb. The amount of gamma's given off by Ra depends on the amount of Ra and it's half life (1600 yrs).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radium

Kalrag
Kalrag is offline
#4
Nov3-10, 03:52 PM
P: 100

How much Gamma Radiation does Radium produce


say im using about 1 - 1 1/2 grams of radium.
Kalrag
Kalrag is offline
#5
Nov3-10, 03:58 PM
P: 100
and that the half life was 1600 years.
RocketSci5KN
RocketSci5KN is offline
#6
Nov3-10, 04:04 PM
P: 157
Quote Quote by Kalrag View Post
say im using about 1 - 1 1/2 grams of radium.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Half-life

Calculate number of atoms you have, plug into equation on this page. You'd need to figure out whether the gamma's come along with the alpha's, or some competing decay path. Also consider the gamma's, etc. of any daughter products with short half lives....


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