Register to reply

Modelling heating requirements for a partially earth-bermed home

Share this thread:
omgwtfbyobbq
#1
Mar23-12, 02:46 PM
P: 4
I'm getting a new house that's as described in my title wth two walls that are earth-bermed. I've seen a couple papers (Here's one indicating that something with concrete on the inside and insulation on the outside with a R-value of about 15 would have a DRE of about 35) on how much less energy a home using a lot of interior thermal mass can use compared to traditional home designs with the same R-value.

Along those lines putting external insulation is a great idea, but none of the papers I've seen have looked at how beneficial it is to insulate something that's earth-bermed on the interior. Seeing as interior insulation is the worst option of those mentioned in the MIT paper, I don't think I would see a huge difference, but I'm still wondering if it would be worthwhile to stick some foam board between the masonry and drywall for a modest r-value increase.
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Climate change increases risk of crop slowdown in next 20 years
Researcher part of team studying ways to better predict intensity of hurricanes
New molecule puts scientists a step closer to understanding hydrogen storage

Register to reply

Related Discussions
Heating Requirements for Forging Process Engineering Systems & Design 0
Energy requirements for heating a liquid under different pressures Classical Physics 4
Energy heating a home? Introductory Physics Homework 3
Coal energy and heating a home . . . Introductory Physics Homework 1
Circuits Wired Partially in Series and Partially in Parallel Introductory Physics Homework 7