Negative Voltage


by gbaby370
Tags: negative, voltage
gbaby370
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#1
Apr24-12, 09:46 PM
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I just completed a problem regarding a Millikan Oil Drop Experiment. I ended up with a negative voltage in the solution.

I am just trying to understand negative voltage. Does it mean that the current will travel from - to + instead of the conventional + to -?
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phinds
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Apr24-12, 09:55 PM
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Quote Quote by gbaby370 View Post
I just completed a problem regarding a Millikan Oil Drop Experiment. I ended up with a negative voltage in the solution.

I am just trying to understand negative voltage. Does it mean that the current will travel from - to + instead of the conventional + to -?
yes it does
haruspex
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Apr25-12, 12:36 AM
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Quote Quote by phinds View Post
yes it does
Umm.. I don't think so. Why would it do that? Conventionally signed current will always flow from the higher (more +ve) potential to the lower.

Waterfox
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Apr25-12, 03:53 AM
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Negative Voltage


If the "-" represents the ground or reference then I believe the "+" can have any potential difference whether positive or negative. In such a case though the "-" terminal will have the higher potential and so conventional current will run from it to the "+" terminal.
phinds
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Apr25-12, 06:58 AM
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Quote Quote by Waterfox View Post
If the "-" represents the ground or reference then I believe the "+" can have any potential difference whether positive or negative. In such a case though the "-" terminal will have the higher potential and so conventional current will run from it to the "+" terminal.
Yeah, that's what I meant, but my simple "yes" was a bit misleading, as haruspex correctly pointed out.


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