Numerical Analysis Forum


by bda23
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bda23
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#1
Apr30-12, 01:48 PM
P: 33
Hi, prompted by another person's post I was wondering whether it was possible to start a Numerical Analysis section for mathematicians, scientists and engineers. I could imagine there's a potentially large group of members who'd benefit from it. Just a suggestion.
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Borek
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#2
Apr30-12, 02:09 PM
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We don't make new forums to wait for traffic, we split the old ones when it is obvious the traffic exists.
jtbell
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#3
Apr30-12, 02:36 PM
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If you're referring to algorithms and programming for numerical methods, the appropriate place is the Programming & Comp Sci subforum of Computers & Technology. We occasionally have threads about Runge-Kutta methods, etc.

bda23
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#4
Apr30-12, 03:02 PM
P: 33

Numerical Analysis Forum


Thanks for your posts, makes sense. Programming for numerical methods can already be helpful, so I will look at those sections you mentioned. Runge-Kutta, finite element, finite volume, etc. was what I was also thinking of, the mathematical theory behind them, the technicalities in using them for problems, etc.
Borek
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#5
Apr30-12, 03:49 PM
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Perfectly fits here and here.
Astronuc
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#6
Apr30-12, 07:23 PM
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Quote Quote by bda23 View Post
Thanks for your posts, makes sense. Programming for numerical methods can already be helpful, so I will look at those sections you mentioned. Runge-Kutta, finite element, finite volume, etc. was what I was also thinking of, the mathematical theory behind them, the technicalities in using them for problems, etc.
FEA/CFD/Multiphysics are often discussed under Mechanical Engineering.

Mathematical theory behind some of this is found in Calculus & Analysis or Differential Equations

Programming & Comp Sci under Computing & Technology would be the place to discuss algorithms and programming.
bda23
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#7
May1-12, 05:32 AM
P: 33
Thanks, I will look at those sections.


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