Astrophotography photos


by Phobos
Tags: astrophotography, photos
LadyStardust
LadyStardust is offline
#397
Jun25-12, 09:41 PM
P: 12
Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
I'd say you need something to mount the camera on. If you plan on doing any exposures longer than about a second or so you need a mount that tracks the sky. Luckily your camera has a relatively low amount of magnification so the accuracy of the mount does not need to be as good as what a telescope generally needs. If you're interested in astrophotography then I would suggest heading over to www.cloudynights.com and going to the forums there. That is pretty much the goto place for the hobby.
Sounds good...for when I have the time. I can barely get a breather with my studies, job AND internship right now :/ I always wanted to try it but browsing endless forums ... well, let's just say I went ADD after 5 seconds. I did figure I'd need a different mount. Which I can't even afford right now.

In the meantime, are there any particular settings I should consider?
Drakkith
Drakkith is offline
#398
Jun25-12, 09:52 PM
PF Gold
Drakkith's Avatar
P: 11,032
Quote Quote by AnnieJackson View Post
Sounds good...for when I have the time. I can barely get a breather with my studies, job AND internship right now :/ I always wanted to try it but browsing endless forums ... well, let's just say I went ADD after 5 seconds. I did figure I'd need a different mount. Which I can't even afford right now.

In the meantime, are there any particular settings I should consider?
That depends entirely on what you are doing with the camera. And as I don't have a normal camera I don't think I can help you in this area.
chemisttree
chemisttree is offline
#399
Jul17-12, 10:33 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
PF Gold
chemisttree's Avatar
P: 3,725
Best one I've seen yet. Of course I didn't take it....

chemisttree
chemisttree is offline
#400
Jul18-12, 12:26 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
PF Gold
chemisttree's Avatar
P: 3,725
Quote Quote by LadyStardust View Post
I just bought a Nikon D5100. I have an 18-55, 55-200 and a NIKKOR AF-S 50mm f/1.8 Lens. What else do I need? Can anyone give me any advice? I've only practiced at our local observatory but that was much easier. I'd like to do some astrophotography without the use of a telescope. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
I'd use the f1.8 lens. Set your ISO setting to 6400 and everything else to manual. Manual focus to infinity, ISO6400, lowest f-number possible and exposure time to 30 sec. Any longer on the exposure time and you will get trailing stars. Aim toward the southern sky at around 11:00 pm at a dark site. You won't see as much near a big city. Do this when there is no moon.

Good luck!
Chronos
Chronos is offline
#401
Jul22-12, 01:54 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
Chronos's Avatar
P: 9,182
I believe most DSLR's are optimized at ISO 400 for long exposures. Assuming that is still true, you should get your best pictures with that setting.
Topher925
Topher925 is offline
#402
Jul22-12, 12:39 PM
Topher925's Avatar
P: 1,672
Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
I believe most DSLR's are optimized at ISO 400 for long exposures. Assuming that is still true, you should get your best pictures with that setting.
I don't think they are really "optimized" for it, they just happen to perform well around that much gain due to the nature of CMOS sensors. There's a lot of controversy around noise injection vs exposure time when it comes to low and high ISO settings. I've always had to use high ISO settings (1600,3200,6400 when its cold out) due to the limitations of my mount/camera but I just got a new mount last week and will soon be testing this theory.
Topher925
Topher925 is offline
#403
Jul27-12, 10:49 AM
Topher925's Avatar
P: 1,672
Finally got some spare time and clear skies a couple nights ago and got to try out my new mount for the first time. I had a lot of technical issues early on in the night but managed to get 15 x 1min exposures of M101. Haven't really had the time to fully process it though.

Drakkith
Drakkith is offline
#404
Jul27-12, 01:20 PM
PF Gold
Drakkith's Avatar
P: 11,032
Not bad for 15 minutes! Get that exposure time into the hour+ mark to really start seeing some detail.
chemisttree
chemisttree is offline
#405
Jul27-12, 09:12 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
PF Gold
chemisttree's Avatar
P: 3,725
Nice round stars! What camera did you use?
davenn
davenn is offline
#406
Jul27-12, 10:15 PM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
davenn's Avatar
P: 2,243
Quote Quote by chemisttree View Post
Nice round stars! What camera did you use?
further to that... what was the telescope, telephoto lens ? prime focus setup ? etc etc

Dave
sas3
sas3 is offline
#407
Jul29-12, 12:52 PM
PF Gold
sas3's Avatar
P: 201
Just thought I would share a picture of my telescope

GEDC1879 by Scottsas3
Topher925
Topher925 is offline
#408
Jul29-12, 05:56 PM
Topher925's Avatar
P: 1,672
Quote Quote by davenn View Post
further to that... what was the telescope, telephoto lens ? prime focus setup ? etc etc

Dave
I use a Pentax K-5 (*gasp* not a Canon, I know). The scope was an Orion ST-80 which is in pretty bad shape but it works surprisingly well for a $100 scope. Mount was a CG-5gt which I quickly setup using a polar scope and two star alignment. If I did a four star alignment and sighted things up a bit I probably could have easily gotten up to three minute exposures I would think.
Topher925
Topher925 is offline
#409
Aug7-12, 07:55 PM
Topher925's Avatar
P: 1,672
Well I got my a new (to me) scope last week and first lighted it last night. I was floored with the higher quality optics. The moon was amazing and in stunning detail. Stars are sharper, colors better, and practically no false color visually.

Pictures come out a lot nicer too. I shot M101 again (among others) to see how it compared to my last scope.

chemisttree
chemisttree is offline
#410
Aug27-12, 01:13 AM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
PF Gold
chemisttree's Avatar
P: 3,725
Quote Quote by Topher925 View Post
If I did a four star alignment and sighted things up a bit I probably could have easily gotten up to three minute exposures I would think.
Using more reference stars only helps with the GOTO functionality of the mount. The tracking accuracy is solely due to polar alignment and cannot be corrected with any alignment methodology except perhaps the polar alignment function on the CG5-ASGT mount. You can autoguide with the CG5-ASGT via the 'Guide' port if you want to use longer exposures or do a very precise drift alignment.

Nice pic of M101 using the new scope. Is it an apo or a reflector?
Topher925
Topher925 is offline
#411
Aug27-12, 06:46 PM
Topher925's Avatar
P: 1,672
Quote Quote by chemisttree View Post
Using more reference stars only helps with the GOTO functionality of the mount. The tracking accuracy is solely due to polar alignment and cannot be corrected with any alignment methodology except perhaps the polar alignment function on the CG5-ASGT mount. You can autoguide with the CG5-ASGT via the 'Guide' port if you want to use longer exposures or do a very precise drift alignment.

Nice pic of M101 using the new scope. Is it an apo or a reflector?
Whoops, what I meant to say was using an ALL-star alignment, not four star. Although lately I've found the polar scope does a better job with polar alignment than the all-star alignment. I've been thinking about guiding but probably won't do that for a while as I'm still progressing up the learning curve.

The scope is an Orion ED80, so its one of those fake APO's. I've got a focal reducer on the way for it. Here's a shot I took of M31 last week with an Astro Tech AT72ED w/FF:



I think I went a little heavy on the high pass filter. I've been learning photoshop CS6 with this image data.
davenn
davenn is offline
#412
Nov14-12, 12:26 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
davenn's Avatar
P: 2,243
This week the population of the far north Queensland city of Cairns, NE Australia, had a boost of some 60,000 or so in its numbers. People from all over Australia and from worldwide converged on the region to catch a glimpse of the 2 minutes of totality that was on offer.
My wife and I did a 3 hour flight from Sydney, Australia, others did 10 hrs in a plane from Perht city on the Australian west coast. This was still nothing compared to those that travelled from the far corners of the earth. From our beach site we were surrounded by people from as close as 5 minutes down the road to those from England, France, Denmark and many other places



it was not looking good at sunrise, with only a thin gap of sky between the horizon and the base of some thick clouds that extended up to ~25 deg elevtion



~10 minutes before totality, the bulk of the cloud finally moved off and we were treated to sun looking decidely smaller




Dave
Attached Thumbnails
IMGP0713a.jpg   IMGP0732a.jpg   IMGP0743a.jpg  
davenn
davenn is offline
#413
Nov14-12, 12:32 AM
Sci Advisor
PF Gold
davenn's Avatar
P: 2,243
Totality was heralded by the Diamond ring effect and the solar filters came off the scopes and cameras




Totality was spectactular and from our location we had 2mins and 2 sec of "lights out"



and before you knew it it was all over and the moon was moving off the sun




Pentax, K5 DSLR; 500mm telephoto witha 2 x teleconverter (1000mm total f/l) f12.6,
iso 3200, exp 125th sec for diamond ring and totality.
ISO 400 and exp 80th sec for solar filtered pics before and after totality

Now if if I manage to aviod "kicking the bucket" in the 16 years, there is another total eclipse that passes right over home in Sydney (Australia) ~2028 - 2029

cheers
Dave
Attached Thumbnails
IMGP0757a.jpg   IMGP0765a.jpg   IMGP0817a.jpg  
Drakkith
Drakkith is offline
#414
Nov14-12, 12:39 AM
PF Gold
Drakkith's Avatar
P: 11,032
Very nice Dave!


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Amateur Astrophotography General Discussion 3
astrophotography limitations Photography 34
Astrophotography Question General Astronomy 9
My Astrophotography Site General Discussion 23
QuickCam Astrophotography General Astronomy 4