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Gravitational Wave

by sky123
Tags: gravitational, wave
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sky123
#1
Nov8-12, 05:29 AM
P: 2
I have a question:
Would Gravity (or gravitational) waves be considered mechanical waves?
Wouldn't the Medium be the space-time continuum itself for these waves?
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mfb
#2
Nov8-12, 08:28 AM
Mentor
P: 11,617
I don't think "mechanical wave" is a useful category for gravitational waves.

Wouldn't the Medium be the space-time continuum itself for these waves?
Right.
FalseVaccum89
#3
Nov8-12, 08:42 AM
FalseVaccum89's Avatar
P: 81
Quote Quote by sky123 View Post
I have a question:
Would Gravity (or gravitational) waves be considered mechanical waves?
Wouldn't the Medium be the space-time continuum itself for these waves?
Well, to my knowledge, not many mechanical waves are qudripole like a gravitational wave is. You are correct in assuming that space-time is the medium for such waves, however. As in it's the local value of the metric (the value of curvature) that changes as said gravitational wave passes through.


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