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Two Empty Sets

by Xidike
Tags: sets
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Erland
#19
Nov10-12, 06:29 AM
P: 339
Quote Quote by Erland View Post
##\exists x[ (x\in \emptyset\wedge \neg x\in \emptyset')]\vee[(x\in \emptyset'\wedge \neg x\in \emptyset )]##
Oops, the parenteses here are partially wrong. It should be:

##\exists x[ (x\in \emptyset\wedge \neg x\in \emptyset')\vee(x\in \emptyset'\wedge \neg x\in \emptyset )]##.
Erland
#20
Nov10-12, 06:40 AM
P: 339
Quote Quote by stauros View Post
Can you support that ,by writing a complete formal proof??

Because i know that it will be useless to ask you ,where did you get the:

"and ##\exists x[ (x\in \emptyset\vee x\in \emptyset')]##" ,part, e.t.c ,e.t.c
Well, how did you get the corresponding line, in your previous post?

If you want a complete formal proof, you must specify which formal system that should be used: which are the axioms and the rules of inference? Is a Hilbert style axiom system (and which variant in this case) or a natural deduction system (and which variant in this case) or some other kind of system?

And whatever system is used, complete formal proofs tend to be extremely lengthy. One almost always takes shortcuts. But you have a habit of questioning all possible shortcuts.
stauros
#21
Nov10-12, 09:01 AM
P: 35
Quote Quote by Erland View Post
Well, how did you get the corresponding line, in your previous post?

If you want a complete formal proof, you must specify which formal system that should be used: which are the axioms and the rules of inference? Is a Hilbert style axiom system (and which variant in this case) or a natural deduction system (and which variant in this case) or some other kind of system?

And whatever system is used, complete formal proofs tend to be extremely lengthy. One almost always takes shortcuts. But you have a habit of questioning all possible shortcuts.
Write a formal proof supporting your argument in any system you like using any rules of inference you like ,i can follow.

There is no other way of checking whether your argument is right or wrong.

But before anything else let us give the definition of a formal proof.

A formal proof is : a finite No of statements ,where each statement is either an axiom or a theorem or a definition or a conclusion by appling a rule of inference on one or more previous statements.
micromass
#22
Nov10-12, 10:27 AM
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P: 18,044
Quote Quote by stauros View Post
There is no other way of checking whether your argument is right or wrong.
Of course there is. It's not because something is not written as a formal proof that you can't see whether it is right or wrong. In fact, when something is not written as a formal proof, it is much easier for me to grasp the proof.

Anyway, the question has been answered. Thread locked.


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