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Does time run fast near universe's edge?

by ksertatas
Tags: edge, time, universe
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ksertatas
#1
Nov10-12, 10:20 AM
P: 3
Hello all, this is my first post. My question is, do any theories exist about time relativity based on distance from universe's center? Also interested your own opinions on the subject.

Thanks,
kadir
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Bandersnatch
#2
Nov10-12, 10:29 AM
P: 710
There is no edge!
phinds
#3
Nov10-12, 10:32 AM
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Quote Quote by ksertatas View Post
Hello all, this is my first post. My question is, do any theories exist about time relativity based on distance from universe's center? Also interested your own opinions on the subject.

Thanks,
kadir
There is no edge and no center to the universe. There is some further discussion here:

www.phinds.com/balloonanalogy

marcus
#4
Nov10-12, 10:59 AM
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Does time run fast near universe's edge?

Quote Quote by ksertatas View Post
Hello all, this is my first post. My question is, do any theories exist about time relativity based on distance from universe's center? Also interested your own opinions on the subject.

Thanks,
kadir
I think the simple answer to your question is probably "no".

In ordinary professional mainstream cosmology your question is meaningless because the universe has no "edge" and no "center".

The part of it that we are currently able to SEE has a center, of course, and we are the center of that region. That region is the currently observable universe. It is a growing region because as time goes on we see more and more.
But the observable region is not the whole thing.

Out near the limits of the observable region we see the matter as it was a long time ago. But there is no indication that physics out there is any different from what it is here.

We get the NEWS from out there in a slowed-down stretched out version because of the expansion of distances that has occurred over the billions of years the light has been traveling. You can see how that would happen--the signal stream has gotten stretched out so there is an APPARENT slowing of time.

But we can allow for that. We see the light from glowing-hot clouds of gas which were out there, and the light has been cooled by having its wavelengths stretched out 1000-fold so it isn't even visible light anymore---just microwave you pick up with a radio dish antenna. But we allow for that. We know the light was originally 3000 degree hot glow, even though it now looks like only 3 degrees. A thousand times cooler.
You could say that time APPEARS to be 1000-fold slower out there near the limit of what we can see. But that is just appearance. The indications are that physics was just the same then as it is now.
ksertatas
#5
Nov11-12, 04:17 AM
P: 3
Thanks for replies. I need some time read these materials. I see there is not a volumetric center of universe. My main question is, does speed of time change based on your location. I mean perhaps time runs faster in somewhere so called -time center- and slows down while you go away from that center. If we can assume that there is such a time speed reference difference, can we think universal gravity coefficient may vary and even go negative?
Note: I am not a physics student or someone reads scientific publications.

Thanks,
kadir
phinds
#6
Nov11-12, 08:54 AM
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Quote Quote by ksertatas View Post
Thanks for replies. I need some time read these materials. I see there is not a volumetric center of universe. My main question is, does speed of time change based on your location. I mean perhaps time runs faster in somewhere so called -time center- and slows down while you go away from that center.
There IS no center. You need to drop that idea.

If we can assume that there is such a time speed reference difference, can we think universal gravity coefficient may vary and even go negative?
No, as far as I can tell, what you are suggesting has no basis in physics at all, it's just something you have made up.

There IS a difference in time inside a gravity well and outside, but unless you are talking about a black hole, the differences are small.

GPS systems require correction due to the fact that the transmitters are higher out of Earth's gravity well than the receivers are.
ksertatas
#7
Nov11-12, 10:17 AM
P: 3
Of course i am making these up. Just asking that are there any theories or studies similar to that idea. I am trying to understand why gravitational pull quits when high distances take place. I do not like dark matter and dark energy things. Thank you all.
kadir


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