I found out new proof of Pythagorean theorem , how can I publish it ?


by Maths Lover
Tags: proof, publish, pythagorean, theorem
Maths Lover
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#37
Nov14-12, 05:47 PM
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Quote Quote by Jimmy Snyder View Post
Original poster, or original post according to context.
thank you , you made it obviousto me :)
micromass
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#38
Nov14-12, 05:49 PM
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Quote Quote by Maths Lover View Post
I didn't understand what you really want to say !

how can you Hijack my thread ?! is it a puzzle ?

explain please ?!
Hijacking a thread is when you start a pedantic argument about something useless that is not really what the OP wants to talk about.
Maths Lover
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#39
Nov14-12, 05:49 PM
P: 62
@Micromass

so , any new proof for any theorem will be treated with the same way ?

or some theorems is diffrent from others ?


what about main theorms in calculus ?
Maths Lover
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#40
Nov14-12, 05:52 PM
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Quote Quote by micromass View Post
Hijacking a thread is when you start a pedantic argument about something useless that is not really what the OP wants to talk about.


ok :)

it's not a problem , I think that your speech wasn't " pedantic argument " , but it made somethings obvious

thank you :)
micromass
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#41
Nov14-12, 05:59 PM
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Quote Quote by Maths Lover View Post
@Micromass

so , any new proof for any theorem will be treated with the same way ?

or some theorems is diffrent from others ?


what about main theorms in calculus ?
No, I wouldn't say that they will all be treated the same way. I guess it depends on the proof itself. If the proof is really novel and provides some kind of idea that can be generalized, then it might be interesting to professionals. Or when the proof illustrates some kind of abstract theory.

A famous example is the insolvability of the quintic. This was originally proven by Abel and Ruffini. But later, Galois proved it using the methods of (what is now called) Galois theory. From a certain point of view, the theorem was already proven. But the proof Galois gave is very intricate and beautiful. Furthermore, it gives exactly a criterium of when a polynomial can be solved or not. And the same method can be generalized to other settings as well (such as integration theory). Finally, Galois theory is one of the most elegant mathematics known to man! Despite Galois theory not really proving anything novel, it is still one of the most important theories in mathematics out there.

If you are interested in Abel's theorem, then I highly recommend the following book: http://www.amazon.com/Abels-Theorem-.../dp/1402021860
It is suitable for high school students who are interested in higher level math. It introduces elegant theories such as groups and Riemann surfaces and it culminates with Abel's theorem.
Jimmy Snyder
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#42
Nov14-12, 06:04 PM
P: 2,163
I was told that the original proof of the Riesz Representation theorem was 300 pages long. I don't know if it's true.
Maths Lover
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#43
Nov14-12, 06:10 PM
P: 62
Quote Quote by micromass View Post
No, I wouldn't say that they will all be treated the same way. I guess it depends on the proof itself. If the proof is really novel and provides some kind of idea that can be generalized, then it might be interesting to professionals. Or when the proof illustrates some kind of abstract theory.

A famous example is the insolvability of the quintic. This was originally proven by Abel and Ruffini. But later, Galois proved it using the methods of (what is now called) Galois theory. From a certain point of view, the theorem was already proven. But the proof Galois gave is very intricate and beautiful. Furthermore, it gives exactly a criterium of when a polynomial can be solved or not. And the same method can be generalized to other settings as well (such as integration theory). Finally, Galois theory is one of the most elegant mathematics known to man! Despite Galois theory not really proving anything novel, it is still one of the most important theories in mathematics out there.

If you are interested in Abel's theorem, then I highly recommend the following book: http://www.amazon.com/Abels-Theorem-.../dp/1402021860
It is suitable for high school students who are interested in higher level math. It introduces elegant theories such as groups and Riemann surfaces and it culminates with Abel's theorem.
I heared about Galois theory for 2 years .
as you know " I think that you know " that I study Abstract Algebra nowdays from Dummit and foote , and Galois theory is the topic of 14th chapter , and I'm very excited to reach this chapter but I still in the second one ,

:))
micromass
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#44
Nov14-12, 06:17 PM
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Quote Quote by Maths Lover View Post
I heared about Galois theory for 2 years .
as you know " I think that you know " that I study Abstract Algebra nowdays from Dummit and foote , and Galois theory is the topic of 14th chapter , and I'm very excited to reach this chapter but I still in the second one ,

:))
Ah, yes, I should have remembered!! But yes, Galois theory is very exciting. I just hope Dummit and Foote cover it the right way and don't try to obfusciate things. A lot of textbooks on Galois theory seem to have this problem.
Maths Lover
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#45
Nov14-12, 06:18 PM
P: 62
Quote Quote by Jimmy Snyder View Post
I was told that the original proof of the Riesz Representation theorem was 300 pages long. I don't know if it's true.
300 pages ! that's great ! and very comblicated too !!

I know the fermat last theorems needed 100 page from prof wiles to be writen !

the funny thing that I tried to find new proof to this Big theorem ! of course I failed " until now at least ! "
Maths Lover
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#46
Nov14-12, 06:20 PM
P: 62
Quote Quote by micromass View Post
Ah, yes, I should have remembered!! But yes, Galois theory is very exciting. I just hope Dummit and Foote cover it the right way and don't try to obfusciate things. A lot of textbooks on Galois theory seem to have this problem.
I hope the same :)

if he did , does artin cover it well ? or he obfuscated it !! ?
jedishrfu
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#47
Nov14-12, 06:28 PM
P: 2,493
Speaking of proofs dont forget the book: Proofs from The Book

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proofs_from_THE_BOOK
micromass
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#48
Nov14-12, 06:30 PM
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Quote Quote by Maths Lover View Post
I hope the same :)

if he did , does artin cover it well ? or he obfuscated it !! ?
I don't really remember his treatment well. But I really like Artin, so I guess he did a good job.

If you're looking for beautiful treatments of Galois theory, then the following books are exellent:

http://www.amazon.com/Galois-Theory-...+galois+theory (this is not the same Artin as the one who wrote the algebra book)

http://www.amazon.com/Abels-Theorem-...ds=Arnold+Abel
micromass
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#49
Nov14-12, 06:31 PM
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Quote Quote by jedishrfu View Post
Speaking of proofs dont forget the book: Proofs from The Book

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proofs_from_THE_BOOK
Ah yes! One of the most beautiful math books out there!
Maths Lover
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#50
Nov14-12, 06:33 PM
P: 62
Quote Quote by micromass View Post
I don't really remember his treatment well. But I really like Artin, so I guess he did a good job.

If you're looking for beautiful treatments of Galois theory, then the following books are exellent:

http://www.amazon.com/Galois-Theory-...+galois+theory (this is not the same Artin as the one who wrote the algebra book)

http://www.amazon.com/Abels-Theorem-...ds=Arnold+Abel
that's great :)
but as you know , I have to study Group theory and Field theory first :)
I think that it's not easy job , is it ?
Galteeth
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#51
Nov17-12, 02:43 AM
P: 320
Hey Maths lover, just out of curiosity what is your native language?
zoobyshoe
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#52
Nov17-12, 04:10 AM
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I don't know where websites are getting the figure of 98 proofs as the current number. A geometry text I have preceeds one proof with the following introduction:

"There are hundreds of known proofs of the Pythagorean theorem. A complilation containing more than 350 proofs appears in The Pythagorean Proposition by Elisha Scott Loomis published by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics."

Googling that book, The Pythagorean Proposition, I find:

http://mathlair.allfunandgames.ca/pythprop.php

which states it has 370 proofs. And is also a difficult book to get hold of. The author of that site, MathLair, say he has reproduced portions of it there, since it's in the public domain.

Note also that, based on this book, Guiness Book of Records calls the Pythagorean Theorem the "most proved theorem".
jedishrfu
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#53
Nov17-12, 08:58 AM
P: 2,493
The 98 comes from the second verse of the song 99 bottles of proof on the wall (or is that beer)...
Maths Lover
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#54
Nov17-12, 09:02 AM
P: 62
Quote Quote by Galteeth View Post
Hey Maths lover, just out of curiosity what is your native language?
I'm Egyptian and My native Language is Arabic


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