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Quantum Communication, ion traps of thermoluminescent materials

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sdwdd
#1
Dec17-12, 01:10 PM
P: 1
Recently I've came by this article:
"Intercontinental quantum liaisons between entangled electrons in ion traps of thermoluminescent crystals" by Robert Desbrandes and Daniel Van Gent
http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0611109

Researchers used ion traps caused by imperfections of the crystals to "store" the entangled particles. Then they concluded an experiment in which one of the crystals was heated and the effect of this action was observed on the second crystal miles away. Their results show that such a communication really took place and was resistant to outside factors to a good extent.

That was really an inspiring reading for me.

But I was surprised that the paper was published in 2006 and during all these years no commercial solutions where built on this idea.

My question is why?
It looks trivial to build a protocol on top of the temperature changes to allow communication.

Can anyone uncover the downsides here?
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DrChinese
#2
Dec18-12, 12:19 PM
Sci Advisor
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DrChinese's Avatar
P: 5,386
Quote Quote by sdwdd View Post
Recently I've came by this article:
"Intercontinental quantum liaisons between entangled electrons in ion traps of thermoluminescent crystals" by Robert Desbrandes and Daniel Van Gent
http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0611109

Researchers used ion traps caused by imperfections of the crystals to "store" the entangled particles. Then they concluded an experiment in which one of the crystals was heated and the effect of this action was observed on the second crystal miles away. Their results show that such a communication really took place and was resistant to outside factors to a good extent.

That was really an inspiring reading for me.

But I was surprised that the paper was published in 2006 and during all these years no commercial solutions where built on this idea.

My question is why?
It looks trivial to build a protocol on top of the temperature changes to allow communication.

Can anyone uncover the downsides here?
Welcome to PhysicsForums, sdwdd!

Quantum entanglement, as demonstrated in the paper, does not allow for classical communication. It is easy to read it differently, but the effect is one which requires a traditional communication method to observe.

There have been a number of earlier tests of quantum communication using other more common techniques. So the paper you cited is not considered groundbreaking in that regard. For example:

http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9810080
matafieu
#3
May30-13, 02:02 AM
P: 1
Is this to say that a binary signal (on/off blip on the graph) could be sent from one entangled crystal located 5 miles underground, to the paired crystal sitting in a vault in downtown DC - in an instant?

Jon_Trevathan
#4
Jul16-13, 09:50 PM
P: 44
Quantum Communication, ion traps of thermoluminescent materials

Quote Quote by sdwdd View Post
Recently I've came by this article:
"But I was surprised that the paper was published in 2006 and during all these years no commercial solutions where built on this idea.

My question is why?
It looks trivial to build a protocol on top of the temperature changes to allow communication.

Can anyone uncover the downsides here?
I have had contact with one of the authors fairly recently.
No downside mentioned.
The authors are pursuing patent protection.


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