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PF Random Thoughts

by protonchain
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turbo
#17731
Jan2-13, 09:29 PM
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Quote Quote by lisab View Post
Kindred soul ! Our first plan was to get married in a volcano in Hawaii. But it's a bit of a hike, and getting the hippy chick who did the officiating down there would have been troublesome.

Well getting her *out* would have been troublesome.

Comment from my hubby: you'd have to be virgins .
You might have been able to find a 10-year-old to be a ring-bearer and nudged them in to the hole.
zoobyshoe
#17732
Jan2-13, 09:52 PM
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Utensil in the garbage disposal! First time I've ever done that. The motor is fine, but I need a new soup spoon.
collinsmark
#17733
Jan3-13, 02:51 AM
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Quote Quote by zoobyshoe View Post
Sounds like she fried her rotors. A mechanic once explained to me the kind of catastrophic failure that might result when you're breaking with metal on metal. I didn't like that scenario, so this time I changed them sooner rather than later. I'm guessing I had about three months of grace period left considering how much pad was left.
That reminds me of another advantage of electric cars and most hybrids. Much (if not most) of the typical breaking is regenerative, and that component of breaking doesn't even involve the break pads. That means that the time averaged wear on the break pads is only a fraction of that of more conventional automobiles (ultimately meaning you don't have to change the break pads as often) -- not to mention, vastly reduced break-dust on the rims, if you happen to have nice rims.
Astronuc
#17734
Jan3-13, 06:39 AM
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What's in a name?

Icelandic girl fights for right to her own name
http://news.yahoo.com/icelandic-girl...074758814.html

BTW - 'C' or 'c' is not in the 32 letter Icelandic alphabet.
Borg
#17735
Jan3-13, 07:10 AM
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Quote Quote by collinsmark View Post
That reminds me of another advantage of electric cars and most hybrids. Much (if not most) of the typical breaking is regenerative, and that component of breaking doesn't even involve the break pads. That means that the time averaged wear on the break pads is only a fraction of that of more conventional automobiles (ultimately meaning you don't have to change the break pads as often) -- not to mention, vastly reduced break-dust on the rims, if you happen to have nice rims.
I noticed last week that my car has 75,000 miles and that I've never had to have the brakes worked on. Inspections are pretty tough here so I'm sure that the inspectors would catch it if it was even close to needing brake work.
AlephZero
#17736
Jan3-13, 08:09 AM
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Quote Quote by collinsmark View Post
That reminds me of another advantage of electric cars and most hybrids. Much (if not most) of the typical breaking is regenerative, and that component of breaking doesn't even involve the break pads. That means that the time averaged wear on the break pads is only a fraction of that of more conventional automobiles (ultimately meaning you don't have to change the break pads as often) -- not to mention, vastly reduced break-dust on the rims, if you happen to have nice rims.
The basic reason you don't have to replace brake pads often is because asbestos brake pads were banned for health reasons. When manufacturers couldm't sell cheap short-life pads any more, they moved to selling high-cost long-life pads instead.

These days, the metal brake discs wear out as fast, or faster, than the pads.
dkotschessaa
#17737
Jan3-13, 08:22 AM
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The computer that I use for no other purpose than to watch netflix has a virus. It's like it got bored and started browsing one night in the red light district of the internet and uhhh...caught something.
Kholdstare
#17738
Jan3-13, 08:34 AM
P: 390
Anybody knows how to keep from dozing off in boring meetings? I can never avoid that.
Michael Redei
#17739
Jan3-13, 08:47 AM
P: 181
Quote Quote by Astronuc View Post
What's in a name?

Icelandic girl fights for right to her own name
http://news.yahoo.com/icelandic-girl...074758814.html

BTW - 'C' or 'c' is not in the 32 letter Icelandic alphabet.
If they don't allow names beginning with or containing the letter 'c', I wonder what they call the main figure in the New Testament. Jesus Godsson?
Borek
#17740
Jan3-13, 08:52 AM
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Quote Quote by Michael Redei View Post
If they don't allow names beginning with or containing the letter 'c', I wonder what they call the main figure in the New Testament. Jesus Godsson?
Jesús Kristur:

http://is.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesús
Michael Redei
#17741
Jan3-13, 09:59 AM
P: 181
Quote Quote by Borek View Post
That Icelandic Wikipedia is most interesting. I see that they have no entry on Bjarne Stroustrup (maybe because he's a Dane), but they do mention his best-known invention: http://is.wikipedia.org/wiki/C%2B%2B
zoobyshoe
#17742
Jan3-13, 11:22 AM
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Quote Quote by AlephZero View Post
The basic reason you don't have to replace brake pads often is because asbestos brake pads were banned for health reasons. When manufacturers couldm't sell cheap short-life pads any more, they moved to selling high-cost long-life pads instead.

These days, the metal brake discs wear out as fast, or faster, than the pads.
I'm sure you're right about asbestos pads but wear on the rotor and the pad would be greatly reduced in a regenerative braking system since some significant part of the the slowing is caused by making the wheel turn a generator and, to the extent that's the case, (the slowing) is not caused by friction between rotor and pad.
collinsmark
#17743
Jan3-13, 01:01 PM
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Quote Quote by zoobyshoe View Post
I'm sure you're right about asbestos pads but wear on the rotor and the pad would be greatly reduced in a regenerative braking system since some significant part of the the slowing is caused by making the wheel turn a generator and, to the extent that's the case, (the slowing) is not caused by friction between rotor and pad.
Thanks, Zooby. That was the original point I was trying to make.

The regenerative part of the breaking transfers energy from the wheels to the generator/motor via the drive train in the same way that normally the generator/motor transfers energy to the wheels, except in reverse (neither of which relies on friction). Most praise about this is that it reclaims energy that would otherwise just be lost to heat (not to mention brake-wear).

My point was that in addition to the energy savings, since it doesn't involve the conventional part of the brakes, it means less frequent brake maintenance, and less brake dust. (And you don't hear about that nice fact as often.)
HeLiXe
#17744
Jan3-13, 03:40 PM
P: 412
I just saw a post where I used the pseudo-word "misleaded" and I was not even under the influence or anything.
Borg
#17745
Jan3-13, 03:45 PM
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I saw this on FailBlog today. I used to work in the same office as the owner and saw it in the parking lot all the time.

HeLiXe
#17746
Jan3-13, 03:49 PM
P: 412
instant LOL
drizzle
#17747
Jan3-13, 04:15 PM
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zoobyshoe
#17748
Jan3-13, 06:18 PM
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Quote Quote by collinsmark View Post
My point was that in addition to the energy savings, since it doesn't involve the conventional part of the breaks, it means less frequent break maintenance, and less break dust. (And you don't hear about that nice fact as often.)
That's true. It didn't occur to me that would be the case before you mentioned it.


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