Register to reply

Why Are There So Few Women in Science?

by Jow
Tags: science, women
Share this thread:
Kholdstare
#37
Jan8-13, 08:37 PM
P: 390
Quote Quote by Kholdstare View Post
No. You are wrong all woman has the exactly equal preference as Astronuc has pointed out.
I'm sorry. I meant equal opportunity.
HeLiXe
#38
Jan8-13, 09:15 PM
P: 412
Quote Quote by Kholdstare View Post
Your first line is confusing. When you say "it was put in place to prevent discrimination", don't you also mean "it prevents discrimination against women" ?
No I do not

Quote Quote by Kholdstare View Post
In today's US any kind of discrimination is not tolerated. In overall sense discrimination is non-existent now thanks to anti-discriminatory laws. Nobody can prevent woman from doing whatever she wants. So there's no point of affirmative action trying to guarantee placement of woman in academics and employment, as nobody's stopping them.

And doing so might make them go against their wish if in a hypothetical scenario less than n number of women wants to enter the field, [where the affirmative action requires at least n number of women enter the field].
What does any of this have to do with why there are so few women in science? Your initial response to my post referenced affirmative action as an aspect of society that encourages women more than men to get into science related fields. I fail to see how someone can choose to go through college and get a career in science related fields just so they can help an organization meet a quota.
WannabeNewton
#39
Jan8-13, 09:30 PM
C. Spirit
Sci Advisor
Thanks
WannabeNewton's Avatar
P: 5,592
I haven't noticed this with physics as much as math. In my special relativity class and advanced mechanics class there were an overwhelmingly large amount of girls but in my differential geometry class there wasn't even one (granted on the first day there was a girl but she dropped out the next day :[). My mom used to tell me how when she was doing her PhD in immunology her graduate biology classes would be filled with guys but nowadays you can easily find female majorities in many biology classes at various unis. I think we just need to give it time; demographics in science fields take time to change - this isn't a surprise.
Kholdstare
#40
Jan8-13, 09:33 PM
P: 390
No I do not


What does any of this have to do with why there are so few women in science? Your initial response to my post referenced affirmative action as an aspect of society that encourages women more than men to get into science related fields. I fail to see how someone can choose to go through college and get a career in science related fields just so they can help an organization meet a quota.
I did not respond with it for OP's question. I did so to clarify that by legal procedures discrimination is already removed where you said "...put in place to prevent discrimination..." which imply somehow discrimination still exists.

I never said "affirmative action as an aspect of society that encourages women more than men to get into science related fields". Rather I said it fails to do so. Please re-read my previous posts.
HeLiXe
#41
Jan8-13, 09:48 PM
P: 412
Quote Quote by Kholdstare View Post
I never said "affirmative action as an aspect of society that encourages women more than men to get into science related fields". Rather I said it fails to do so. Please re-read my previous posts.
I said you referenced affirmative action as an aspect of society that encourages women more than men to get into science related fields...I was not quoting you in that context.
Quote Quote by Kholdstare View Post
Today's society already encourages women more than men in science field (in overall sense). e.g. affirmative action, title IX etc.
^^This is the previous post that addressed my post and I responded to it. I cannot logically deduce from this statement that you are saying affirmative action fails to encourage women more than men to get into science related fields. Anyways I digress...all of this is really not addressing the OP and I'm not sure I'll be clear on what your stance is regarding the points of our discussion.
FalconOne
#42
Jan8-13, 10:00 PM
P: 38
Self-imposed quotas are illegal. They technically can't exist.

It's technically illegal for an employer or school to take my military obligation into consideration when deciding if they are going to accept me. Unfortunately, one school told me that if I was seriously interested in their program, I would find a way to make it to their visit day. I have training for four months. I can't "find a way" to leave, lol. Anyway, I basically have come to accept that I'll be discriminated against. I'll probably get my doctorate, get married, become a mom, and never get hired. It's ok.

My little sister, who is in eighth grade, came to me with physics homework. I helped her, and I asked her why her grades aren't so good. "Good grades are for boys." Yikes! And then my parents say that she probably won't go to college, so they are grooming her for sports and having her take "easy classes" in high school. It might be a cultural thing. My grandma is more worried about me getting married than me graduating college. I'm 23 and unmarried - how horrible!

Anyway, those might be reasons why women don't go into science. Almost all my high school friends are stay-at-home moms, for instance.
Kholdstare
#43
Jan8-13, 10:01 PM
P: 390
Quote Quote by HeLiXe View Post
I said you referenced affirmative action as an aspect of society that encourages women more than men to get into science related fields...I was not quoting you in that context.

^^This is the previous post that addressed my post and I responded to it. I cannot logically deduce from this statement that you are saying affirmative action fails to encourage women more than men to get into science related fields. Anyways I digress...all of this is really not addressing the OP and I'm not sure I'll be clear on what your stance is regarding the points of our discussion.
I dont know how you missed this post.

Affirmative action have nothing to do with enabling women in science positions. It was there to bring the numbers to equal. Neither does it encourages women to go to science itself than anything else nor does it prevent discrimination against them. Rather it establishes a series of social myths.
In my first post I naively wrote it encourages. However, with further analysis I saw that false and changed my stance. I fail to see why you skipped all that and argued me over my initial response.
WannabeNewton
#44
Jan8-13, 10:12 PM
C. Spirit
Sci Advisor
Thanks
WannabeNewton's Avatar
P: 5,592
Quote Quote by FalconOne View Post
I'm 23 and unmarried - how horrible!

Anyway, those might be reasons why women don't go into science. Almost all my high school friends are stay-at-home moms, for instance.
23 and unmarried how dare you young lady! I do agree with you that the school environment and the family environment play a role in all that. I recently graduated from an all science and math high school and almost all of my female friends chose either biological engineering, computer engineering, computer science (the majority), or some other form of engineering for their major. In my family, I have a female cousin about to graduate high school and her parents gladly support her wanting to go into astrophysics and want her to stay away from marriage as long as possible (as do my parents with respect to me). So yeah I agree that one's family values and priorities as well as the female culture in schools play big roles but the times they are a changin' .
Kholdstare
#45
Jan8-13, 10:12 PM
P: 390
Quote Quote by FalconOne View Post
Self-imposed quotas are illegal. They technically can't exist.

It's technically illegal for an employer or school to take my military obligation into consideration when deciding if they are going to accept me. Unfortunately, one school told me that if I was seriously interested in their program, I would find a way to make it to their visit day. I have training for four months. I can't "find a way" to leave, lol. Anyway, I basically have come to accept that I'll be discriminated against. I'll probably get my doctorate, get married, become a mom, and never get hired. It's ok.

My little sister, who is in eighth grade, came to me with physics homework. I helped her, and I asked her why her grades aren't so good. "Good grades are for boys." Yikes! And then my parents say that she probably won't go to college, so they are grooming her for sports and having her take "easy classes" in high school. It might be a cultural thing. My grandma is more worried about me getting married than me graduating college. I'm 23 and unmarried - how horrible!

Anyway, those might be reasons why women don't go into science. Almost all my high school friends are stay-at-home moms, for instance.
FalconOne, I'm just curious. Which country are you from?
lisab
#46
Jan8-13, 10:27 PM
Mentor
lisab's Avatar
P: 2,985
Quote Quote by Kholdstare View Post
FalconOne, I'm just curious. Which country are you from?
I think since this topic is bound to have a strong cultural influence, giving your country of origin would be helpful for all participants -- totally optional, of course. But it would provide some context.
drizzle
#47
Jan8-13, 10:33 PM
PF Gold
drizzle's Avatar
P: 525
Quote Quote by lisab View Post
I think since this topic is bound to have a strong cultural influence, giving your country of origin would be helpful for all participants -- totally optional, of course. But it would provide some context.
For real, Lisa?


Edit: Just to elaborate more on my.. point [], I think it's a personal option to be whatever they want to be. No need to blame surroundings, and one should be responsible of her/his choices.
FalconOne
#48
Jan8-13, 10:34 PM
P: 38
I'm in the US, but my grandparents came from Poland! I just live in a really rural area. Verizon Wireless doesn't service us, I am on dial up, etc.

Also, out of a high school class of almost 150, only 20 of us went to college. Not all of us graduated.
Evo
#49
Jan8-13, 10:36 PM
Mentor
Evo's Avatar
P: 26,524
And kholdstare is not from the US, which is why he/she has an odd perspective.
drizzle
#50
Jan8-13, 10:43 PM
PF Gold
drizzle's Avatar
P: 525
Quote Quote by Evo View Post
And kholdstare is not from the US, which is why he/she has an odd perspective.
How do you know?
WannabeNewton
#51
Jan8-13, 10:46 PM
C. Spirit
Sci Advisor
Thanks
WannabeNewton's Avatar
P: 5,592
Quote Quote by Gad View Post
How do you know?
The all seeing evo. I'm disappointed you would even question her abilities Gad.
drizzle
#52
Jan8-13, 10:50 PM
PF Gold
drizzle's Avatar
P: 525
Quote Quote by WannabeNewton View Post
The all seeing evo. I'm disappointed you would even question her abilities Gad.
If it's not seen here, or in kholdstare's profile, these posts should be deleted. It's the member's privacy, s/he has the right to share that piece of information or not.
Evo
#53
Jan8-13, 11:02 PM
Mentor
Evo's Avatar
P: 26,524
Quote Quote by Gad View Post
If it's not seen here, or in kholdstare's profile, these posts should be deleted. It's the member's privacy, s/he has the right to share that piece of information or not.
There are 196 countries in the world, although they'e made it obvious in previous posts, IIRC, since I knew without ever looking.

Saying he's not American is not saying where he is from.
drizzle
#54
Jan8-13, 11:08 PM
PF Gold
drizzle's Avatar
P: 525
Quote Quote by Evo View Post
There are 196 countries in the world, although they'e made it obvious in previous posts, IIRC, since I knew without ever looking.

Saying he's not American is not saying where he is from.

What I meant is that piece of information you just gave us, is unnecessary.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Women in Engineering and Computer Science Career Guidance 67
Women in Science Academic Guidance 24
What's the science evidence for this? Do women have as much as calves muscles as men? Biology 3
Science Careers In Search Of Women Career Guidance 0
Women in Science General Discussion 12