Register to reply

Two line charges lie in the XY plane...

Share this thread:
weresquid
#1
Jan21-13, 02:32 PM
P: 2
1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
Line A extends from (2,2, 0) to (-2, 2, 0) and line B extends from (2, -2, 0) to (-2, -2, 0). Each has a linear charge density ρl = 1 nC / m. You want to calculate the magnitude and direction of the electric field due to the two line charges for all points on the z-axis.

a.) Sketch the charge distribution, and set up the integrals you need in order to
solve this problem. Indicate the vector R for each line charge on your plot,
and determine expressions for R and R3

b.) Prove that the magnitude of the electric field in the x and y directions is
zero.

2. Relevant equations
See pdf attachment.

3. The attempt at a solution
So far I've tried doing the integration technique shown in the attached pdf (this was a class example) and I am not quite sure if that's correct since there are no Z components. Also this problem is with two line charges and not one... so I guess I am basically having trouble finding out where to start? Any help is appreciated.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Line Charges.pdf (162.9 KB, 4 views)
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
FIXD tells car drivers via smartphone what is wrong
Team pioneers strategy for creating new materials
Team defines new biodiversity metric
haruspex
#2
Jan21-13, 03:25 PM
Homework
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
P: 9,850
What do you see as the differences between the class example and the present problem? What can you do to relate the one to the other?
weresquid
#3
Jan21-13, 04:19 PM
P: 2
I'm guessing that I could do that formula for each line and then just sum up their total e-fields?

haruspex
#4
Jan21-13, 09:41 PM
Homework
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
P: 9,850
Two line charges lie in the XY plane...

Quote Quote by weresquid View Post
I'm guessing that I could do that formula for each line and then just sum up their total e-fields?
Yes. And the other difference is? (You mentioned a concern regarding z components.)


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Find the point of intersection of the plane and line. Determine if line lies in plane Calculus & Beyond Homework 5
LinAlg: Parametric Equation of a Line, given a parallel plane and perpendicular line Calculus & Beyond Homework 0
Point of intersection of a line and plane. No points in plane given. Wheres SUPERMAN? Calculus & Beyond Homework 8
HELP! columbs law/charges 2 charges on a line, looking for Introductory Physics Homework 1
Uniform linear charges and plane charges and mastering physics? Introductory Physics Homework 1