Integer Coeffieicent of Degree


by shihabdider
Tags: coeffieicent, degree, integer
shihabdider
shihabdider is offline
#1
Feb11-13, 05:46 PM
P: 9
Hello all,

Can anyone explain what "Integer Coefficient of Degree n" where n is some positive integer (e.g 6) of a polynomial refers to?

I know what integers and coefficients are but I don't know what the above refers to. For example if you had something like this:

Suppose some polynomial f(x) exists with integer coefficients of degree 12 where f(0)=2

What would this polynomial look like/ how would you write or calculate the expression?

Thank You
Shihab
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Petek
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#2
Feb11-13, 06:44 PM
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Suppose some polynomial f(x) exists with integer coefficients of degree 12 where f(0)=2
I think that the phrase "of degree 12" refers to the polynomial, not the integer coefficients. A better way to write the sentence is

Suppose that there exists a polynomial of degree 12 and having integer coefficients such that f(0) = 2.
HallsofIvy
HallsofIvy is offline
#3
Feb24-13, 08:48 AM
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Thanks
PF Gold
P: 38,881
Or:
"Suppose some polynomial f(x) exists, with integer coefficients, of degree 12 where f(0)=2"

Note the commas. Stll better would be
"Suppose some polynomial f(x), with integer coefficients, exists, of degree 12 where f(0)=2


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