Accepting a position not related to physics


by CalcYouLater
Tags: accepting, physics, position
CalcYouLater
CalcYouLater is offline
#1
Feb27-13, 11:40 AM
P: 55
I graduated with a BA in physics in December 2012 in the United States and am currently searching for a job.

I have a connection at a company that manufactures bearings, seals, and rings among other things for a variety of industries. Some examples of these industries are: medical systems, semiconductor, heavy machinery, aerospace and defense, and renewable energy.

I was offered a position at this company to work on the assembly line. The position was advertised to me as an opportunity to get my foot in the door.

I feel as though I should attempt to find a more technical position that requires a background in science/engineering.

Does anyone here have any experience or insight as to how your first job out of college has affected your future job choices/opportunities?

As of now, my resume is pretty blank as far as work experience goes (only restaurant jobs) and I am anxious to replace my current work experience section.
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
Simplicity is key to co-operative robots
Chemical vapor deposition used to grow atomic layer materials on top of each other
Earliest ancestor of land herbivores discovered
ModusPwnd
ModusPwnd is online now
#2
Feb27-13, 11:48 AM
P: 834
Personally, I would take it. There is no such thing as jobs related to physics (besides being a physicist). Technical positions require specific technical skills. Being able to calculate eigenvalues is not one of them. ;) One of the few technical skills that physics undergrad often develop is programming. That is probably the most "sciencey" skill new grads have to market. Otherwise, if you want an engineering job consider getting an engineering degree.
CalcYouLater
CalcYouLater is offline
#3
Feb27-13, 12:42 PM
P: 55
Quote Quote by ModusPwnd View Post
Personally, I would take it. There is no such thing as jobs related to physics (besides being a physicist). Technical positions require specific technical skills. Being able to calculate eigenvalues is not one of them. ;) One of the few technical skills that physics undergrad often develop is programming. That is probably the most "sciencey" skill new grads have to market. Otherwise, if you want an engineering job consider getting an engineering degree.
Thanks for the advice. I can certainly agree with your post.

lisab
lisab is offline
#4
Feb27-13, 01:44 PM
Mentor
lisab's Avatar
P: 2,914

Accepting a position not related to physics


I think you should take it, too.

First jobs are almost never glamorous.
EternityMech
EternityMech is offline
#5
Feb27-13, 01:57 PM
P: 93
Bachelors in physics to become a factory worker??? i must live in a bubble...no idea the jobmarket was that bad.
jesse73
jesse73 is offline
#6
Feb27-13, 02:20 PM
P: 392
Quote Quote by EternityMech View Post
Bachelors in physics to become a factory worker??? i must live in a bubble...no idea the jobmarket was that bad.
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/20/bu...anted=all&_r=0

Bachelors degrees are becoming more common as requirements for jobs which didnt traditionally require them.

Supply and demand at its simplest.
pi-r8
pi-r8 is offline
#7
Feb27-13, 03:38 PM
P: 146
Can you tell us more about the specifics of the job? A position to work on the assembly line could mean a lot of different things. If you're just doing manual labor for low pay then that's really bad. But if you're running high-tech machinery, getting paid well, and have a union that could actually be a great job.
CalcYouLater
CalcYouLater is offline
#8
Feb27-13, 09:03 PM
P: 55
Quote Quote by lisab View Post
I think you should take it, too.
First jobs are almost never glamorous.
Thanks for the reply. I feel that I have a grandiose idea of what a first job would be like. I realize that it is silly to day-dream about my first job in that way, and it is helpful to read your post.

Quote Quote by EternityMech View Post
Bachelors in physics to become a factory worker??? i must live in a bubble...no idea the jobmarket was that bad.
While I would like to believe the same, I do not have any experience in the job market other than the limited time that I have been searching for jobs. It would be nice to expect that a great position that suites me is out there waiting. However, I think it is much better for me to adapt to reality and deal with the choices that are directly in front of me rather than what may or not be.

Quote Quote by pi-r8 View Post
Can you tell us more about the specifics of the job? A position to work on the assembly line could mean a lot of different things. If you're just doing manual labor for low pay then that's really bad. But if you're running high-tech machinery, getting paid well, and have a union that could actually be a great job.
I can gather more information about the specifics of the job, just not at the current moment. I will post again in a day or two with more information as soon as I get in touch with someone that knows more. I can tell you that the position pays around $21.00/hour (around $43000/year), and has a union. I am not sure about the machinery or any other details at this time.


Thanks for all the replies, it really helps to have others opinions. It is making this part of the decision process much more clear to me.
Ben Espen
Ben Espen is offline
#9
Feb28-13, 01:48 PM
P: 187
Quote Quote by CalcYouLater View Post
I can gather more information about the specifics of the job, just not at the current moment. I will post again in a day or two with more information as soon as I get in touch with someone that knows more. I can tell you that the position pays around $21.00/hour (around $43000/year), and has a union. I am not sure about the machinery or any other details at this time.
This seems like a decent job. If you don't have any other offers it seems prudent to take it. Not knowing what company this is, I cannot tell you what kinds of opportunities you may find later. However, it is not unknown to move into a technical position from the manufacturing floor at a later date in the company I work for, so it is possible. Even if that is not the case here, this position will allow you to support yourself and gain experience.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Thinking of withdrawing from a class and not accepting a research position Academic Guidance 23
Some Problem Related to Position vs Time Graph Introductory Physics Homework 3
High-Paying jobs accepting physics BAs? Career Guidance 6
A question related with propagators in position space Quantum Physics 0
Help with Physics related project (non school related) General Physics 21