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Aperture of ISO telescope

by Quagz
Tags: aperture, telescope
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Quagz
#1
May6-12, 01:01 PM
P: 9
a bit random to this but could any of you give me an example aperture for a telescope collecting ISO far-infrared radiation. (to assist a theory about Andromeda)
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Drakkith
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May6-12, 01:05 PM
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Quote Quote by Quagz View Post
a bit random to this but could any of you give me an example aperture for a telescope collecting ISO far-infrared radiation. (to assist a theory about Andromeda)
An example aperture? What do you mean?
Quagz
#3
May7-12, 11:23 AM
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The aperture (light/radiation gathering area in meter squared) of a telescope collecting ISO Far-infrared radiation :)

Drakkith
#4
May7-12, 03:27 PM
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Aperture of ISO telescope

Quote Quote by Quagz View Post
The aperture (light/radiation gathering area in meter squared) of a telescope collecting ISO Far-infrared radiation :)
Yes, I know what an aperture is, but I don't know what you mean by asking for an example aperture. I'm sure apertures range from a few millimeters to multi-meter designs.
Quagz
#5
May9-12, 11:36 AM
P: 9
The Aperture is different for every telescope depending on what radiation it is gathering, i kneed to know an aperture for a telescope gathering ISO Far-infrared radiation.
sas3
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May9-12, 01:00 PM
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Quote Quote by Quagz View Post
The Aperture is different for every telescope depending on what radiation it is gathering, i kneed to know an aperture for a telescope gathering ISO Far-infrared radiation.
No the aperture is in reference to how much radiation you want to gather not what type of radiation. Normally bigger is better, maybe you are thinking of the focal point, that does change for the different types of light.

If not then I am confused by your question also???
Drakkith
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May9-12, 03:07 PM
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Quote Quote by Quagz View Post
The Aperture is different for every telescope depending on what radiation it is gathering, i kneed to know an aperture for a telescope gathering ISO Far-infrared radiation.
As Sas3 said, the aperture isn't usually dependent on the type of light you want to capture. A bigger aperture simply captures more light overall, of any type.
Redbelly98
#8
May9-12, 06:40 PM
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I've moved this discussion to a new thread, since it's not really related to Astrophotography.

Quote Quote by Quagz View Post
a bit random to this but could any of you give me an example aperture for a telescope collecting ISO far-infrared radiation. (to assist a theory about Andromeda)
As others said, your question is worded rather strangely. ISO -- the Infrared Space Observatory -- is one specific telescope with a definite aperture, so it is odd to ask for an "example aperture" when asking about a specific telescope. It's kind of like asking "please give an example of John Smith's last name". Unless you mean something entirely different by ISO?

According to Wikipedia, the ISO has an aperture of 60 cm.
collinsmark
#9
May10-12, 06:08 PM
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Also, try researching/googling "resolving power" of a telescope.

The ability for a telescope to resolve two objects of an given angular distance is a function of the telescope's aperture. It is also a function of the wavelength of light being observed. This is the result of diffraction.

The detail is proportional to the aperture, and inversely proportional to the wavelength.

Putting it a different way: The bigger the aperture, the smaller the diffraction. The bigger the wavelength, the bigger the diffraction.

Resolving power can be expressed as

[tex] \sin \theta = 1.220 \frac{\lambda}{D} [/tex]

Where [itex] \theta [/itex] is the minimum angular separation in radians, [itex] \lambda [/itex] is the wavelength of the light, and [itex] D [/itex] is the telescope's aperture.

And since [itex] \theta [/itex] is bound to be small for any practical telescope application, you might want to make the approximation (for small [itex] \theta [/itex]), [itex] \sin \theta \approx \theta [/itex]

Although the above is fine and good, it really represents the maximum resolving power. Other factors such as atmospheric "seeing" can reduce the effective resolution (for Earth based telescopes) to something worse than what is given above.
Quagz
#10
May11-12, 11:03 AM
P: 9
@collinsmark Many thanks for you reply and also understanding the question unlike some :)


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