Register to reply

Trignometric simple function:-

by Huygen121
Tags: function, simple, trignometric
Share this thread:
Huygen121
#1
May7-14, 07:27 AM
P: 7
Can you please tell me the reason behind this relation:-

y=tanx

Domain:-

R-{(n*180) + 180/2),n ε Z(integers))}

but how can n belong to integer because if n belong to integer than an angle would be negative and i dont think so that negative angles are there,i think that in place of (integers),natural nos. should come.but why they dont put natural nos. in place of integers,there??
Phys.Org News Partner Mathematics news on Phys.org
Heat distributions help researchers to understand curved space
Professor quantifies how 'one thing leads to another'
Team announces construction of a formal computer-verified proof of the Kepler conjecture
Mentallic
#2
May7-14, 07:48 AM
HW Helper
P: 3,540
Of course there are negative angles. All trig functions extend infinitely in the positive and negative directions.
Huygen121
#3
May7-14, 08:10 AM
P: 7
can you give me an example related to it by just using the tan x and putting value in it?

Huygen121
#4
May7-14, 08:16 AM
P: 7
Trignometric simple function:-

can the tan of an angle be negative,if so,then how?
jbriggs444
#5
May7-14, 08:27 AM
P: 965
Quote Quote by Huygen121 View Post
can you give me an example related to it by just using the tan x and putting value in it?
You can use a calculator. Select degree mode if needed. Input -45. Press TAN. The result should be -1.

Physically, this would correspond to pointing your arm at an object that is 100 feet away horizontally and 100 feet down vertically. The angle is 45 degrees below horizontal and the tangent of the angle is the result of dividing the opposite side (-100 feet vertical) by the adjacent side (100 feet horizontal).
Huygen121
#6
May7-14, 09:05 AM
P: 7
Quote Quote by jbriggs444 View Post
You can use a calculator. Select degree mode if needed. Input -45. Press TAN. The result should be -1.

Physically, this would correspond to pointing your arm at an object that is 100 feet away horizontally and 100 feet down vertically. The angle is 45 degrees below horizontal and the tangent of the angle is the result of dividing the opposite side (-100 feet vertical) by the adjacent side (100 feet horizontal).
but what exactly (-) minus sign indicates as we know dimensions are same to + angle ?
Mark44
#7
May7-14, 09:33 AM
Mentor
P: 21,313
Quote Quote by Huygen121 View Post
can the tan of an angle be negative,if so,then how?
Because an angle can be negative. An angle is defined by two rays that extend from a common point. In mathematics, the starting ray usually extends out along the x-axis. If you rotate a terminal ray counterclockwise, you get a positive angle. If you rotate the terminal ray clockwise, you get a negative angle.
Huygen121
#8
May7-14, 10:37 PM
P: 7
Quote Quote by Mark44 View Post
Because an angle can be negative. An angle is defined by two rays that extend from a common point. In mathematics, the starting ray usually extends out along the x-axis. If you rotate a terminal ray counterclockwise, you get a positive angle. If you rotate the terminal ray clockwise, you get a negative angle.

can quadrants represent direction?
Huygen121
#9
May8-14, 12:13 AM
P: 7
what is the use of negative axis in graph? simple question and it will clear my all doubts
Mentallic
#10
May8-14, 03:15 AM
HW Helper
P: 3,540
Quote Quote by Huygen121 View Post
what is the use of negative axis in graph? simple question and it will clear my all doubts
It sounds as though you have a problem with negative numbers in general. The negative axis on a graph is there because negative numbers exist as much as the positive numbers exist.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Non negative Measurable function and Simple function Calculus & Beyond Homework 0
Simple function question (Function to represent radius) Calculus & Beyond Homework 1
[measure theory] measurable function f and simple function g Precalculus Mathematics Homework 1
Using Trignometric Integration Calculus & Beyond Homework 7
Nth derivative of a trignometric function Calculus & Beyond Homework 2