Ziggs boson


by Sussan
Tags: boson, ziggs
Sussan
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#1
Feb7-14, 07:52 PM
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What is Professor Susskind talking about when he refers to the Ziggs boson? Is ziggs simply a Z boson with the weak hypercharge or something else?

Sussan
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samalkhaiat
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#2
Feb8-14, 01:35 PM
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I know of no "Ziggs" in particle physics. The man tries to be "funny" some times and so he "invents" names. Was he by any chance talking about spontaneous symmetry breaking? If he was, then he means the Higgs boson.

Sam
Bill_K
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#3
Feb9-14, 04:29 AM
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Quote Quote by Sussan View Post
What is Professor Susskind talking about when he refers to the Ziggs boson? Is ziggs simply a Z boson with the weak hypercharge or something else?
I think he was discussing a toy model, as a warmup, in which the only symmetry is U(1) and the only gauge boson the Z. Then the Higgs-like particle that breaks the symmetry in this model he calls the Ziggs.

Sussan
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#4
Feb9-14, 06:38 AM
P: 16

Ziggs boson


Quote Quote by Bill_K View Post
I think he was discussing a toy model, as a warmup, in which the only symmetry is U(1) and the only gauge boson the Z. Then the Higgs-like particle that breaks the symmetry in this model he calls the Ziggs.
Thanks. Am I wrong or does Susskind have this "thing" about the Higgs? He acts to my mind as if he either hates the idea or the man behind it. I understand he is very much "in-tune" with this area, however just belittles others in his field a tad much. I understand he hung with Feynman in his youth going places and doing things with him and to this end I believe he picked up some bad habits and tries a tad too much perhaps to emulate him, however his story telling leaves a LOT to be desired.
So there is no Ziggs is what you are saying?

Sussan
Sussan
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#5
Feb9-14, 06:55 AM
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Quote Quote by Bill_K View Post
I think he was discussing a toy model, as a warmup, in which the only symmetry is U(1) and the only gauge boson the Z. Then the Higgs-like particle that breaks the symmetry in this model he calls the Ziggs.
Quote Quote by samalkhaiat View Post
I know of no "Ziggs" in particle physics. The man tries to be "funny" some times and so he "invents" names. Was he by any chance talking about spontaneous symmetry breaking? If he was, then he means the Higgs boson.

Sam
I noticed that as well kinda making things (names) up as he goes. He will also say "there's no name for it" then go on and state well there is a name it is so-so. What's that about... maybe his approach to driving an idea into one's mind? He does well until he starts changing the names of events etc.. thus throwing minds like mind into a tizzy. My IQ is 135 ish so not the most brightest bulb in this room, so sure don't need any help with "confusion" if you get my drift.

Sussan
BrettJimison
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#6
Feb17-14, 12:19 AM
P: 35
Its been a while since I saw that lecture, but I think he was talking about goldstone bosons. They are longitudinal polarizations of Z bosons ( and W's) but in that case he was talking about the Z hence "Ziggs"? Goldstone bosons arise in the broken symmetry of SU(2) U(1). I believe he was talking about symmetry breaking (hence electroweak symmetry breaking) and that would involve goldstone bosons.

I may be way off here but If I remember right I think that's what he was talking about.....
Haelfix
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#7
Feb17-14, 05:24 AM
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The Ziggs particle(s) Susskind is referring too actually has several names in the literature, and they aren't always consistent (they are sometimes labeled differently in different textbooks etc). What he is presenting is a simplified picture of a more complicated story, although he makes this distinction to emphasize that there is in fact such a story.

It is important to note that this is not the Higgs boson or the Z boson.

Basically what he is referring to are the physical excitations of the Higgs vacuum condensate. In the standard model, this is actually represented by a 4 component field of 'Higgses'.

I will call these guys H+, H-, H0, h. This field interacts (in a complicated way) with 4 different massless gauge bosons that I will call W1, W2, W3 and B, where certain linear combinations of the W's mix into states that then get eaten by the Goldstone bosons in order to finally create the massive W+, W-, Z (and residual massless photon).

The Higgs boson (the h) is basically the residual excitation of the radial excitation of this full potential.

Flip Tanedo does a good job of explaining this in a series of posts.

http://www.quantumdiaries.org/2011/1...etry-breaking/
Bill_K
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Feb17-14, 07:24 AM
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Quote Quote by Haelfix View Post
What he is presenting is a simplified picture of a more complicated story, although he makes this distinction to emphasize that there is in fact such a story.
It is important to note that this is not the Higgs boson or the Z boson.
Like I said above:

Quote Quote by Bill_K View Post
I think he was discussing a toy model, as a warmup, in which the only symmetry is U(1) and the only gauge boson the Z. Then the Higgs-like particle that breaks the symmetry in this model he calls the Ziggs.


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