Is Kepler 22 visible?


by tinypositrons
Tags: kepler, visible
tinypositrons
tinypositrons is offline
#1
Jan26-14, 05:44 PM
P: 28
Kepler 22 has generated some hype because it was the first star to have a planet in the habitable "goldilocks" zone to be found by the Kepler Space Telescope. I also know it is somewhere in the constellation of Cygnus. I have done many a Google search on this, yet returned nothing. My question is: is Kepler 22 visible from earth with a telescope. If so, where in Cygnus is it. If no, would it be visible via a small optical telescope if the atmosphere and local backlight were removed, (ie. on ISS).

Thanks,
Fin
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glappkaeft
glappkaeft is offline
#2
Jan26-14, 06:18 PM
P: 82
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kepler-22


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