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Will a matter get 0 volume on -273 C?

by Govind_Balaji
Tags: absolute 0, bose-einstein, matter
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Govind_Balaji
#1
May4-14, 09:18 AM
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Today in my chemistry class, the teacher said:

When a substance is cooled closer to 0K, it will for Bose-Einstein Condensate, but if we cool it further to absolute zero, the substance will attain zero volume.


Is it true? If yes I have a doubt. 0 vloume means the matter will demolish right? Then how will the mass of the demolished matter be conserved according to Law of conservation of mass?
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mfb
#2
May4-14, 09:32 AM
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This is not true.
Also note that a full Bose-Einstein condensate is the lowest-energy state (for bosons), it is at 0 K and you cannot make it cooler.
Govind_Balaji
#3
May4-14, 09:40 AM
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Do you mean the lowest possible temperature a matter can be cooled is 0 k?

mfb
#4
May4-14, 09:56 AM
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Will a matter get 0 volume on -273 C?

That's the definition of 0 K, yes.


There is a good reason to assign negative temperature values to some systems, but those are hotter than any system with zero or positive temperature.
OCR
#5
May4-14, 09:32 PM
P: 124
There are some very interesting properties of a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC)...

When the JILA team raised the magnetic field strength still further, the condensate suddenly reverted to attraction, imploded and shrank beyond detection, and then exploded, expelling off about two-thirds of its 10,000 or so atoms. About half of the atoms in the condensate seemed to have disappeared from the experiment altogether, not being seen either in the cold remnant or the expanding gas cloud.

Carl Wieman explained that under current atomic theory this characteristic of Bose–Einstein condensate could not be explained because the energy state of an atom near absolute zero should not be enough to cause an implosion...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bose%E2...ein_condensate
Govind_Balaji
#6
May5-14, 03:04 AM
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Quote Quote by OCR View Post
There are some very interesting properties of a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC)...



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bose%E2...ein_condensate
That's what I asked. What happened to those protons and electorns of the disappeared atoms.

Were they conserved?
DrClaude
#7
May5-14, 03:27 AM
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Quote Quote by Govind_Balaji View Post
That's what I asked. What happened to those protons and electorns of the disappeared atoms.

Were they conserved?
Yes, they were just not detected. If you had read the Wikipedia entry, you would have seen after twhat OCR quoted:
Most likely they formed molecules consisting of two bonded rubidium atoms.
Also, the statement
When a substance is cooled closer to 0K, it will for Bose-Einstein Condensate
is mostly false. When a substance is cooled [Edit: to a low enough temperature], it forms a solid [Edit: with the exception of helium, which becomes superfluid]. Only in very special cases, such as for dilute gases, does a bunch of bosons can be coerced to form a BEC. It is not trivial to do!
Govind_Balaji
#8
May5-14, 03:38 AM
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thank you DrClaude
sludger13
#9
May5-14, 02:06 PM
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Could a real rate of matter volume become infinitely small? If you are convinced it cannot be done in the universe, then the absolute zero cannot be achieved in the universe.

Also a demolition of the matter in 0 volume, as a real phenomenon, makes no sense to consider.


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