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Surface tension dependence on temperature

by deb2014
Tags: dependence, surface, temperature, tension
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deb2014
#1
Feb3-14, 03:45 AM
P: 3
Hello,

I am looking for a general formula for the surface tension dependence with respect to temperature.

I am aware of the Eötvös rule (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E%C3%B6tv%C3%B6s_rule), but I only found data for water, and wonder if there are some for other compounds.

Also, I wonder if speaking of surface tension for water with a temperature below the freezing point is meaningfull ?

To my opinion, as soon as a liquid freezes, it takes a cristal form with much stronger links molecules between themselves, so that the Kelvin effect would no more take place.

Am I right ?
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Dadface
#2
Feb3-14, 05:02 AM
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I wasn't aware of an Eotvos rule and because of your link I have just looked at it for the first time. It looks pretty good to me and it seems it can be applied to different liquids. You need to look up the density, critical temperature and molar mass of the liquid and you can probably get this information by searching a site such as NIST.
deb2014
#3
Feb3-14, 06:53 AM
P: 3
Thanks for your answeer

I am just still wondering if surface tension (as well as kelvin effect) has a physical meaning for solid/air interface ?

Dadface
#4
Feb3-14, 08:57 AM
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Surface tension dependence on temperature

Quote Quote by deb2014 View Post
Thanks for your answeer

I am just still wondering if surface tension (as well as kelvin effect) has a physical meaning for solid/air interface ?
I think there must be surface tension type (or analogous) effects wherever there is an interface between two different mediums including solid to solid, liquid to solid and so on. Consider a molecule in one of the mediums. The closer it is to the interface the more strongly it feels the effects of those molecules in the opposite medium.
deb2014
#5
Feb3-14, 02:24 PM
P: 3
Thans again for your answeer, which seems to me quite convincing.

I would also say that the surface tension solid/air should be greater than liquid/air
because molecules in the solid are much more tightened than in the liquid,

do not know if it is a good inference, nevertheless, as for the Kelvin effect,
which directly depends on the surface tension, I think it does not exist for solid/air interfaces
because Kelvin effect needs a curved surface, where as solid is, at microscale level, somewhat of a flat surface (infinite curvature)

Best regards


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