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Why is silver acetate sort of insoluble?

by McSpongy
Tags: acetate, silver, solubility
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McSpongy
#1
Mar27-14, 08:17 PM
P: 3
One of my first solubility lessons regarded the great ability of the acetate ion to form a water-soluble salt with any other cation.
One of my most recent lessons regarded the great ability of the silver(I) ion to override the previous rule.
Why is silver the only ion that makes a not-as-soluble acetate? Would it happen also with methanoate or propanoate? I searched for those two and couldn't find them.
Furthermore, would a solution of silver acetate eventually form silver hydroxide because of the basic properties of the acetate ion?
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eigenperson
#2
Mar28-14, 11:23 PM
P: 160
I can't answer the question about why silver makes so many insoluble ionic compounds.

But I do know that the reaction AgOAc + H2O → AgOH + HOAc will not occur spontaneously. OH- is a stronger base than OAc- and HOAc is a stronger acid than H2O, so the preferred reaction is very much in the opposite direction.
McSpongy
#3
Mar29-14, 11:19 PM
P: 3
I supposed the acetate would partially form acetic acid, as the weak base it is, and some of the generated hydroxide ions would find their way into a happy ionic marriage with some of the aqueous silver, and the solution would have a growing brown color.
It happened in my head.


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