Register to reply

Fukashima Containment

Share this thread:
Tapestry
#1
Nov30-13, 03:39 AM
P: 4
It doesn't look like anybody is doing anything effective or at least anything practical to contain/stop the Fukashima radiation disaster.What I was wondering as a remedy,beyond the concrete entombment like in Chernobyl is if some other method could be used.What I was thinking about was various early nuclear tests where atomic bombs were set off in heavy steel containers.Also Russia experimented with a particle beam weapon where a nuke was set off in a long,heavy metal cylinder that had a small opening at one end to release this particle or energy beam.So what we see is a nuclear bomb being shielded or contained by a heavy steel casing.Since there doesn't seem to be any sophisticated technology being used to deal with the Fukashima crisis could this crude method work? Could a very thick (maybe hundreds of feet?) metal case or ball be built to completely surround the Fukashima reactors.Also what if the fuel in the Fukashima reactors could be ignited (by a nuke) placed inside this monstrously thick metal ball.Would the ball remain intact and stifle the explosion and if it did would this allow a quicker degradation of the radiation and a safer disposal of it?
Phys.Org News Partner Science news on Phys.org
World's largest solar boat on Greek prehistoric mission
Google searches hold key to future market crashes
Mineral magic? Common mineral capable of making and breaking bonds
Drakkith
#2
Nov30-13, 03:45 AM
Mentor
Drakkith's Avatar
P: 11,554
What? I'm pretty sure there are no containers that are able to withstand nuclear blasts.
voko
#3
Nov30-13, 03:52 AM
Thanks
P: 5,677
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Undergr...uclear_testing

256bits
#4
Nov30-13, 09:50 AM
P: 1,417
Fukashima Containment

And perhaps this
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_meltdown
sigma_
#5
Nov30-13, 10:58 PM
P: 32
I'm not sure any manmade container could contain a nuclear blast. The sheer amount of heat generated couldn't be handled by any static material. Some sort of flow shielding would be needed.
David Christo
#6
Nov30-13, 11:04 PM
P: 18
Japan sure saved themselves a lot of money though.

I'm sure they would be happy to skip some more expensive safety measures in the future too.

I'm also pretty sure they will sometime soon be taking over someone elses property anyway.
sigma_
#7
Nov30-13, 11:05 PM
P: 32
Quote Quote by David Christo View Post
Japan sure saved themselves a lot of money though.

I'm sure they would be happy to skip some more expensive safety measures in the future too.

I'm also pretty sure they will sometime soon be taking over someone elses property anyway.
Before you get too caught up in your hating:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onagawa...wer_Plant#2011
David Christo
#8
Nov30-13, 11:49 PM
P: 18
Quote Quote by sigma_ View Post
Before you get too caught up in your hating:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onagawa...wer_Plant#2011
I see your point.

Thanks.
Tapestry
#9
Dec2-13, 03:28 AM
P: 4
...of course there's always the "Hutchison Effect" which purportedly changes the physical structure and composition of metals.Why wouldn't it work on metals like uranium and plutonium to possibly deactivate their radioactivity?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-YwbgXpnkA
nikkkom
#10
Dec2-13, 05:55 AM
P: 595
Quote Quote by Tapestry View Post
It doesn't look like anybody is doing anything effective or at least anything practical to contain/stop the Fukashima radiation disaster.
This comes from someone who didn't even bother learning the proper name of the place? It's not "Fukashima".

I could address other points in your posting but... why bother?
Drakkith
#11
Dec2-13, 07:40 AM
Mentor
Drakkith's Avatar
P: 11,554
Quote Quote by Tapestry View Post
...of course there's always the "Hutchison Effect" which purportedly changes the physical structure and composition of metals.Why wouldn't it work on metals like uranium and plutonium to possibly deactivate their radioactivity?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-YwbgXpnkA
Because that video is absolute nonsense. I don't know what that was in the video, but it definitely isn't a "solid iron bar". It'd be hard for a solid iron bar to collapse inward on itself since it's, you know, solid. Besides, plutonium and uranium are radioactive because of the number of protons and neutrons they contain. The only thing that can change this is various radioactive decay processes or by purposely causing them to fission.
Tapestry
#12
Dec2-13, 09:41 PM
P: 4
..."It'd be hard for a solid iron bar to collapse inward on itself since it's, you know, solid. Besides, plutonium and uranium are radioactive because of the number of protons and neutrons they contain. The only thing that can change this is various radioactive decay processes or by purposely causing them to fission."

If you heated the iron to say 3.000 degrees F it would quickly collapse inwardly and outwardly (i.e. melt) into a puddle! How does anybody know with certainty what are the only forces that can change the physical composition of uranium or plutonium? Extreme heat and extreme cold also change the characteristics of radioactive matter.Vibration/Resonance is another force that affects all matter and atomic bonds.Maybe there are other forces that are still unknown to science.The Hutchison Effect hasn't been disproven and it is still getting a lot of attention and study.
p.s. People probably wouldn't mistake the word Fukashima for Chernobyl or anywhere else...they'd know in the context it was used that it referred to Fukushima in Japan! Nitpicking is proof of nothing but pettiness!
Drakkith
#13
Dec2-13, 11:30 PM
Mentor
Drakkith's Avatar
P: 11,554
Quote Quote by Tapestry View Post
If you heated the iron to say 3.000 degrees F it would quickly collapse inwardly and outwardly (i.e. melt) into a puddle!
Yes, which didn't happen in the video. The "bar" collapsed inward and twisted around itself as if it were hollow.

How does anybody know with certainty what are the only forces that can change the physical composition of uranium or plutonium? Extreme heat and extreme cold also change the characteristics of radioactive matter.Vibration/Resonance is another force that affects all matter and atomic bonds.
We don't know with absolute certainty but we've been working with radioactive materials for over a hundred years and radioactive decay rates have only been shown to change in very specific conditions, none of which either uranium or plutonium meet.

See here: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physic...cay_rates.html

Maybe there are other forces that are still unknown to science.
If so, their effects are very subtle and difficult to detect. Something that could drastically effect the decay rates of nuclei should be extremely obvious.

The Hutchison Effect hasn't been disproven and it is still getting a lot of attention and study.
Not according to my own searches into it. Hutchinson is a crackpot and a fraud and so is the "Hutchinson Effect".
Tapestry
#14
Dec3-13, 04:34 AM
P: 4
"Yes, which didn't happen in the video. The "bar" collapsed inward and twisted around itself as if it were hollow."

You don't know what happened to that bar or have any proof it was hollow.

"We don't know with absolute certainty but we've been working with radioactive materials for over a hundred years and radioactive decay rates have only been shown to change in very specific conditions, none of which either uranium or plutonium meet."

What authority says you have to change the Radioactive Decay Rates to change the structure of an object?

"If so, their effects are very subtle and difficult to detect. Something that could drastically effect the decay rates of nuclei should be extremely obvious."

How do you know? Maybe today's science is still to primitive to see something that would be obvious with more advanced tools...like the microscope was for revealing the existence of germ organisms!

"Not according to my own searches into it. Hutchinson is a crackpot and a fraud and so is the "Hutchinson Effect"."

You don't have any definitive proof of that.Not only does it parallel work done by Tesla (which was it's inspiration) but also there's been way too much government interest to casually dismiss the Hutchinson Effect. If it is real it's a potential threat people who would use nuclear energies in dangerous ways.That John Hutchinson presents himself as a Weirdo is undebatable.
voko
#15
Dec3-13, 05:20 AM
Thanks
P: 5,677
Extreme heat and pressure can indeed transmutate materials. The other name for that is "thermonuclear reactions". They happen in stars and is the source of everything in the universe that is not hydrogen. We are made of the result of the extreme heat and pressure.

But that has nothing to do with the crackpottery of that Hutchinson guy.
Astronuc
#16
Dec3-13, 05:51 AM
Admin
Astronuc's Avatar
P: 21,827
Closed pending moderation.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Where are melted Fukashima cores going? Nuclear Engineering 11
Fukashima: The Effect of Sulphuric Acid on Plutonium? Nuclear Engineering 3
Are there any nuclear power plants on oceanic coastlines like Fukashima? Nuclear Engineering 25
Footage of Fukashima reactor Nuclear Engineering 16
Containment problem Set Theory, Logic, Probability, Statistics 5