understanding computer memory


by aaaa202
Tags: memory
aaaa202
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#1
Jan13-14, 06:41 PM
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I understand that giant magnetoresistance is the effect that you can change the conductivity by a magnetic field and the basics of how it works in terms of spin etc.
But how is this exactly used to store memory?
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berkeman
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Jan13-14, 08:57 PM
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Quote Quote by aaaa202 View Post
I understand that giant magnetoresistance is the effect that you can change the conductivity by a magnetic field and the basics of how it works in terms of spin etc.
But how is this exactly used to store memory?
It's not. At least in mainstream computer memories. What technology are you asking about? Links?
SteamKing
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#3
Jan13-14, 11:13 PM
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It's possible the OP is confusing magnetic recording technology used on hard drives with RAM and ROM internal computer memory.

meBigGuy
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#4
Jan15-14, 01:17 AM
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understanding computer memory


Ferromagnetic memories using magneto resistive effects rely on a magnetizable element that affects the resistance of an adjacent magneto-resistive material. The magneto-resistive material is essentially used to sense the state of the storage material.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magneto...-access_memory
sophiecentaur
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#5
Jan15-14, 08:50 AM
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I read the heading at the top of the Wiki reference above. It says
The lead section of this article may need to be rewritten.
which, considering the subject, made me smile.

The history of computer memory and storage technologies makes amazing reading. There have been so many different solutions. Magnetism has been there, periodically, since the beginning.
thankz
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#6
Jan20-14, 01:02 PM
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he must be talking about the old magnetic core memories used in the 60s
sophiecentaur
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Jan20-14, 01:12 PM
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Quote Quote by thankz View Post
he must be talking about the old magnetic core memories used in the 60s
Not quite, but the old core store type of memory element was based on the same principle, or so it says in the Wiki article. The non-volatile nature of it makes it very desirable - no need to reboot after a power down.


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