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Can two objects having same sign charges attract each other

by Vibhor
Tags: attract, charges, objects, sign
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Vibhor
#1
Apr22-13, 01:51 AM
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Hello

A neutral charged object can be attracted to a charged body due to electrostatic induction.A charged body will induce charges of opposite polarity in the neutral body ,hence causing attraction.

But is it possible that two bodies having same sign charges ,say two positive bodies ,attract each other.Can the two positive bodies attract each other .In other words can a body with higher positive charge induce negative charge in the second body carrying lower positive charge ?

Thanks
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tiny-tim
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Apr22-13, 03:46 AM
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Hello Vibhor! Welcome to PF!

Yes, for the reason you give

if the geometry is right, a small charge on the second body shouldn't cancel out the effect.
Jano L.
#3
Apr22-13, 04:51 AM
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Yes, more papers conclude that charged with like charges objects can attract each other. For example,

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...04388611001902

Danger
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Apr22-13, 08:45 AM
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Can two objects having same sign charges attract each other

I know that this isn't at all what you have in mind, but in fact they always attract gravitationally. That's completely insignificant in comparison to the effects of other forces, but it should be mentioned.
mathman
#5
Apr22-13, 02:55 PM
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Within nuclei the strong force keeps protons (and neutrons) together in spite of the electrical charge repulsion.
Vibhor
#6
May1-13, 03:47 AM
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Quote Quote by tiny-tim View Post
Hello Vibhor! Welcome to PF!

Yes, for the reason you give

if the geometry is right, a small charge on the second body shouldn't cancel out the effect.
Thanks for the welcome...Sorry for responding late...I dont have internet connection at home...

Could you elaborate with an example of how should the geometry be like ?
tiny-tim
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May1-13, 04:09 AM
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Quote Quote by Vibhor View Post
Thanks for the welcome...Sorry for responding late...I dont have internet connection at home...

Could you elaborate with an example of how should the geometry be like ?
Hello Vibhor!

If you start with a charged body inducing an opposite charge on the near side of an overall uncharged body (and so attracting it),

that happens because the charges on the overall uncharged body separate, with the "same" charges going to the far side.

Now introduce some extra "same" charge it will distribute itself across the body, and if there isn't enough of it, it won't cancel out the opposite charge on the near side.

The further away the far side is, the more charge you can put in without cancelling the effect

so a long thin body would be best.
Vibhor
#8
May1-13, 04:17 AM
P: 155
Quote Quote by tiny-tim View Post

The further away the far side is, the more charge you can put in without cancelling the effect

so a long thin body would be best.
How does that matter ? The "same charge" would anyhow be attracted and neutralised by the opposite charge on the near end .Isnt it ?


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