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Induced V, due to self inductance?

by Dash-IQ
Tags: induced, inductance
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Dash-IQ
#1
Aug8-14, 02:09 PM
P: 108
In a DC circuit(Yes, keep going), when current starts to flow, and that current needs a bit of time to stabilize to its maximum value. Since there is change in current(increase) there is an increasing magnetic field, a changing flux... that will induce a -V to the circuit. Eventually when current stabilizes at t0, the induced V due to self inductance = 0 right?

But, how does current stabilize when there is that -V opposing it? Would the PS apply more voltage?
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Jony130
#2
Aug8-14, 02:20 PM
P: 410
Try read this
http://www.physicsforums.com/showpos...3&postcount=42


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