A current of electrons


by Antigone
Tags: current, electrons
Antigone
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#1
Feb8-14, 01:31 PM
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An magnetic field can make a current flow of electrons. But can the magnetic field make the protons move or is it "just" the electrons that flow?
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DaleSpam
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Feb8-14, 01:35 PM
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Any charge carrier can be made to move. It metals the charge carriers are negatively charged, but in electrolytes they can be positive.
Vanadium 50
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Feb8-14, 03:07 PM
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When a magnet moves a piece of iron, did the protons (and neutrons) move too or just the electrons?

Drakkith
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#4
Feb8-14, 05:38 PM
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A current of electrons


Quote Quote by Antigone View Post
An magnetic field can make a current flow of electrons. But can the magnetic field make the protons move or is it "just" the electrons that flow?
In a normal conductor, such as a copper wire, the protons don't move because they are bound together in a lattice and cannot move. The electrons that make up the current flow are free to flow around the metal, thus a voltage will cause them to move.
Antigone
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Feb8-14, 06:23 PM
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Quote Quote by DaleSpam View Post
Any charge carrier can be made to move. It metals the charge carriers are negatively charged, but in electrolytes they can be positive.
Yes, thank you for teaching me that.


Quote Quote by Vanadium 50 View Post
When a magnet moves a piece of iron, did the protons (and neutrons) move too or just the electrons?
The neutron that moves must be seen as an object that moves ind irectly because of the magnetic field. Because it has zero net charge, and therefore cannot be affected by the magnetic field in a direct way. At least I think so, though I am no expert on these stuff, just trying to learn.


Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
In a normal conductor, such as a copper wire, the protons don't move because they are bound together in a lattice and cannot move. The electrons that make up the current flow are free to flow around the metal, thus a voltage will cause them to move.
That is what I Think, too.


Above contemplations has risen these questions.
1) Can a object that has zero net charge be affected by a magnetic field? If yes, what is it that happens?
2) If an object has zero net charge and is moving through a magnetic field, would it experience the force of the magnetic field or would it be like moving in vacuum? Would it move "slower"?

Thank you
mal4mac
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#6
Feb9-14, 02:28 AM
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If the protons in your house wiring move then your cable costs are going to be *very* high, and I'd call the police not your power company if your wiring disappears.

"Hello, is this Electro-cartel, my protons have gone, did the wire flow back to your power plant?"

But the protons in the iron filings I put next to the magnet certainly moved!
DaleSpam
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Feb9-14, 06:49 PM
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Quote Quote by Antigone View Post
Above statement mean that a strong enough magnetic field can affect a human body, or a cat, or a dog. Now please tell me how. What is happening when it does so? I have Always wondered. Perhaps you mean that the magnetic domains of the human body in a strong enough magnetic field would be affected? So then a object like a cat or a human can be affected?
Here is a good link on the topic

http://www.ru.nl/hfml/research/levitation/diamagnetic/
Vanadium 50
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Feb9-14, 08:16 PM
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A number of off-topic messages have been removed.

I think a very fundamental question to the OP is what "counts". A magnet can pick up a piece of iron. Somehow that doesn't count, so it would probably help to have a clearer idea of what he's looking for.
Khashishi
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#9
Feb10-14, 03:57 PM
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In general, motion of all charges, including electrons and protons, contribute to the electrical current. But in a wire, only the electrons contribute, since the metal is solid and normally fastened down to something.


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