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Interested in hydrology/hydrogeology. What do I do next?

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intelart
#1
Jul12-12, 05:06 PM
P: 2
I am a college sophomore who has recently changed her major from Music to Physics.I'm planning on helping a professor with his research in acoustics in the fall. Right now, I want to at least explore the fields of hydrology and hydrogeology, but I don't know where to start.

My college has an environmental science program. While it does have a few geology classes and the major has a good dose of science, I'm not sure if they would know what to do with a physics major. I've already done plenty of online research (ie. Google) and found some research programs I could apply for, but I want to wait a year until I have some more physics coursework under my belt.

So if anyone can recommend a good introductory book, or places to look for job shadowing, or any other way, I can explore this field before I go off to get a Master's?

P.S. How is funding for hydrology grad students? Do students usually get some sort of assistantship or am I likely looking at more loans?
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jbrussell93
#2
Jul13-12, 10:17 AM
jbrussell93's Avatar
P: 365
I was in a similar situation a semester or two ago with geophysics (which I believe hydrology can be grouped with). I do not know a lot about hydrology research, but what I do know is that much of it is housed in the geology/geophysics departments. I figure you probably know this already but you did not make it absolutely clear in your post. I would suggest looking in the geology department at your school and talking with a professor about the research going on. I know of physics students doing geophysics research in the geology department at my school. As far as funding for graduates in hydrology research, I would assume it is similar to other branches of geophysics which is typically pretty good from what I hear. Generally, if you have to take out loans for grad school then you are at the wrong institution.

Good Luck!
intelart
#3
Jul13-12, 04:13 PM
P: 2
Thanks!

and when i mean grad school, I meant a Master's degree. I realized that many people see "grad school" and "doctorate" as synonyms, so I thought I'd clarify.


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