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When getting phase angle difference, do amplitudes have to be positive

by Vishera
Tags: amplitudes, angle, difference, phase, positive
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Vishera
#1
Mar21-14, 02:17 PM
P: 45
$$f(x)=32sin(x+60)\quad and\quad g(x)=-1.5sin(x+45)$$

Would the phase angle difference here be 15 or is that incorrect? I think the amplitudes don't have to be the same but I'm not sure if they at least have to be both positive.
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mathman
#2
Mar21-14, 03:37 PM
Sci Advisor
P: 6,070
-sin(a) = sin(a+π). See what happens.
ttxjoog
#3
Mar21-14, 10:10 PM
P: 1
n = 180 and a<90, for -sin(a) = sin(a+n)

Vishera
#4
Mar24-14, 11:38 AM
P: 45
When getting phase angle difference, do amplitudes have to be positive

$$-1.5sin(x+45)\\ =1.5sin(x+225)$$

Here the phase angle difference is 165. So which would be more correct? The phase angle difference is simply defined as the difference between the two phase angles in two sinusoids, right? So are they both right?
mathman
#5
Mar24-14, 03:33 PM
Sci Advisor
P: 6,070
When you look at the graphs, the phase difference is the difference between corresponding points (e.g. max) on the the two curves. Therefore they both need to expressed with the same sign. In this case 225 is the correct value for phase difference.


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