Register to reply

Oranges and drywall

by claegreid
Tags: bar physics, drywall, orange, oranges, wtfbbq
Share this thread:
claegreid
#1
Oct18-13, 04:02 PM
P: 3
OK, PF, I have an argument to settle and I need some expert advice.
A friend of mine claims that it is possible to throw an orange through a 1/2" sheet of drywall (gypsum board); several other friends refute his claim. I would like to do the math to prove/disprove the theory, but my line of work doesn't give me a lot of practice with the physics of such dynamic elements.

Question to the forum: how would I go about setting up an equation solve for this problem.

Thanks in advance!
Phys.Org News Partner Physics news on Phys.org
Engineers develop new sensor to detect tiny individual nanoparticles
Tiny particles have big potential in debate over nuclear proliferation
Ray tracing and beyond
Khashishi
#2
Oct18-13, 04:21 PM
P: 887
Why don't you just give it a try?
claegreid
#3
Oct18-13, 04:23 PM
P: 3
Quote Quote by Khashishi View Post
Why don't you just give it a try?
That's the next step. But if I find out how much force is necessary and it is more than a human arm can supply, then I will have to build a cannon of sorts to achieve what man cannot.

berkeman
#4
Oct18-13, 04:25 PM
Mentor
berkeman's Avatar
P: 41,143
Oranges and drywall

Quote Quote by claegreid View Post
OK, PF, I have an argument to settle and I need some expert advice.
A friend of mine claims that it is possible to throw an orange through a 1/2" sheet of drywall (gypsum board); several other friends refute his claim. I would like to do the math to prove/disprove the theory, but my line of work doesn't give me a lot of practice with the physics of such dynamic elements.

Question to the forum: how would I go about setting up an equation solve for this problem.

Thanks in advance!
1/2" drywall is not very strong. Especially if you freeze the orange first...
AlephZero
#5
Oct18-13, 05:50 PM
Engineering
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
Thanks
P: 7,178
Quote Quote by berkeman View Post
Especially if you freeze the orange first...
And don't forget that if a baseball pitcher or a cricket fast bowler did the experiment, the orange would hit the drywall traveling at more than 90 mph.
CWatters
#6
Oct20-13, 08:33 AM
P: 3,154
Perhaps google for the impact properties of drywall. If you can't find them you will have to do the experiment.
sophiecentaur
#7
Oct20-13, 06:14 PM
Sci Advisor
Thanks
PF Gold
sophiecentaur's Avatar
P: 12,203
Don't try this at home, folks!
mic*
#8
Oct20-13, 10:58 PM
P: 58
Quote Quote by claegreid View Post
That's the next step. But if I find out how much force is necessary and it is more than a human arm can supply, then I will have to build a cannon of sorts to achieve what man cannot.
Uh, this seems to be outside the conditions of the OP... ? I refer to the word "throw"...
meBigGuy
#9
Oct20-13, 11:22 PM
P: 1,084
The question becomes one of whether the orange will fly apart from the acceleration or air turbulence before it gets enough momentum to break the drywall.

http://www.gypsum.org/wp/wp-content/.../GA-235-10.pdf talks about drywall strength.
I'd have to learn more about the methods used for measurement of Effective Modulus of Rupture (MOR) per ASTM C 1396 to understand how to apply the numbers.

Are you considering a freestanding 4x8 sheet? or one nailed to 17" studs?
phyzguy
#10
Oct21-13, 08:49 AM
P: 2,179
Only somewhat related, but I love this movie of a cannon firing a 2x4 through a brick wall.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pot7UI5SLb8


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Apples and oranges Fun, Photos & Games 10
Apples and oranges Linear & Abstract Algebra 9
Corrosive Drywall From China General Discussion 6
Paint/Drywall question General Discussion 16
Plasteroard/drywall Lift Help Engineering Systems & Design 1