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Oranges and drywall

by claegreid
Tags: bar physics, drywall, orange, oranges, wtfbbq
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claegreid
#1
Oct18-13, 04:02 PM
P: 3
OK, PF, I have an argument to settle and I need some expert advice.
A friend of mine claims that it is possible to throw an orange through a 1/2" sheet of drywall (gypsum board); several other friends refute his claim. I would like to do the math to prove/disprove the theory, but my line of work doesn't give me a lot of practice with the physics of such dynamic elements.

Question to the forum: how would I go about setting up an equation solve for this problem.

Thanks in advance!
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Khashishi
#2
Oct18-13, 04:21 PM
P: 887
Why don't you just give it a try?
claegreid
#3
Oct18-13, 04:23 PM
P: 3
Quote Quote by Khashishi View Post
Why don't you just give it a try?
That's the next step. But if I find out how much force is necessary and it is more than a human arm can supply, then I will have to build a cannon of sorts to achieve what man cannot.

berkeman
#4
Oct18-13, 04:25 PM
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Oranges and drywall

Quote Quote by claegreid View Post
OK, PF, I have an argument to settle and I need some expert advice.
A friend of mine claims that it is possible to throw an orange through a 1/2" sheet of drywall (gypsum board); several other friends refute his claim. I would like to do the math to prove/disprove the theory, but my line of work doesn't give me a lot of practice with the physics of such dynamic elements.

Question to the forum: how would I go about setting up an equation solve for this problem.

Thanks in advance!
1/2" drywall is not very strong. Especially if you freeze the orange first...
AlephZero
#5
Oct18-13, 05:50 PM
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Quote Quote by berkeman View Post
Especially if you freeze the orange first...
And don't forget that if a baseball pitcher or a cricket fast bowler did the experiment, the orange would hit the drywall traveling at more than 90 mph.
CWatters
#6
Oct20-13, 08:33 AM
P: 3,135
Perhaps google for the impact properties of drywall. If you can't find them you will have to do the experiment.
sophiecentaur
#7
Oct20-13, 06:14 PM
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Don't try this at home, folks!
mic*
#8
Oct20-13, 10:58 PM
P: 58
Quote Quote by claegreid View Post
That's the next step. But if I find out how much force is necessary and it is more than a human arm can supply, then I will have to build a cannon of sorts to achieve what man cannot.
Uh, this seems to be outside the conditions of the OP... ? I refer to the word "throw"...
meBigGuy
#9
Oct20-13, 11:22 PM
P: 1,083
The question becomes one of whether the orange will fly apart from the acceleration or air turbulence before it gets enough momentum to break the drywall.

http://www.gypsum.org/wp/wp-content/.../GA-235-10.pdf talks about drywall strength.
I'd have to learn more about the methods used for measurement of Effective Modulus of Rupture (MOR) per ASTM C 1396 to understand how to apply the numbers.

Are you considering a freestanding 4x8 sheet? or one nailed to 17" studs?
phyzguy
#10
Oct21-13, 08:49 AM
P: 2,179
Only somewhat related, but I love this movie of a cannon firing a 2x4 through a brick wall.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pot7UI5SLb8


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