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Non-Nucleon Stable Hadronic Matter

by Superposed_Cat
Tags: hadronic, matter, nonnucleon, stable
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Superposed_Cat
#1
Nov24-13, 06:37 AM
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Hi, aside from nucleons is there any other stable (metastable doesn't count in this question) hadronic matter that could form 'exotic atoms' in a way? Thanks for any help.
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mfb
#2
Nov24-13, 08:08 AM
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Nucleons and nuclei (and their antipartners of course) are the only known stable hadronic objects.

Positronium as exotic atom consists of stable particles, but there is still annihilation as decay process.
dauto
#3
Nov24-13, 10:52 AM
Thanks
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Strangelets are a hypothetical form of baryonic matter composed of a combination of up, down and strange quarks. For now it is only hypothetical.

phyzguy
#4
Nov24-13, 11:02 AM
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Non-Nucleon Stable Hadronic Matter

Do neutron stars count? They are stable hadronic objects.
Superposed_Cat
#5
Nov24-13, 02:10 PM
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hypothetically could a quark bind to a different particle via the electromagnetic force?
mfb
#6
Nov24-13, 03:39 PM
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Quote Quote by phyzguy View Post
Do neutron stars count? They are stable hadronic objects.
Not purely hadronic.

Quote Quote by Superposed_Cat View Post
hypothetically could a quark bind to a different particle via the electromagnetic force?
Quarks always carry their color charge, and the strong interaction is much stronger than the electromagnetic interaction (at least at energy scales where bound states are possible).
The_Duck
#7
Nov24-13, 05:28 PM
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Quote Quote by Superposed_Cat View Post
hypothetically could a quark bind to a different particle via the electromagnetic force?
Yes, they can bind to electrons; the result is called an atom.
Superposed_Cat
#8
Nov25-13, 02:39 AM
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but they are in baryonic form then, im saying single quark isolated from any others so they dont bind and it binds to something else.
TumblingDice
#9
Nov25-13, 04:13 AM
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I kinda' thought all quarks have been inseparable since the strong force and energy levels allowed. And that trying to separate them worked against the strong force since its influence increases over distance, and the energy input into the attempt would create new quarks (pairs at minimum) before the strong force was overcome. So is there any way to isolate a single quark?
mfb
#10
Nov25-13, 09:03 AM
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Quote Quote by TumblingDice View Post
I kinda' thought all quarks have been inseparable since the strong force and energy levels allowed. And that trying to separate them worked against the strong force since its influence increases over distance, and the energy input into the attempt would create new quarks (pairs at minimum) before the strong force was overcome. So is there any way to isolate a single quark?
There is no known way to isolate individual quarks. A Big Rip, maybe.


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