radiation pattern of crt tv with small loop antenna


by mishima
Tags: antenna, loop, pattern, radiation
mishima
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#1
Sep12-13, 08:37 AM
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I was playing with an old crt TV and a small loop antenna earlier and noticed that when I hold the antenna vertically in front of the TV I get one solid spike at around 15 kHz. When I hold the antenna horizontally I get a multitude of spikes that are not there when I turn off the TV.

This suggests to me that the field lines in the space inside my antenna are oriented in such a way that the magnetic field is horizontal, and the electric field is vertical. This is since the small loop antenna is affected most by magnetic fields, and they must be passing through the loop to induce current. Is that correct?
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berkeman
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Sep12-13, 11:05 AM
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Quote Quote by mishima View Post
I was playing with an old crt TV and a small loop antenna earlier and noticed that when I hold the antenna vertically in front of the TV I get one solid spike at around 15 kHz. When I hold the antenna horizontally I get a multitude of spikes that are not there when I turn off the TV.

This suggests to me that the field lines in the space inside my antenna are oriented in such a way that the magnetic field is horizontal, and the electric field is vertical. This is since the small loop antenna is affected most by magnetic fields, and they must be passing through the loop to induce current. Is that correct?
Assuming the B-field loop probe (often called "sniffer" probes) is made correctly, then yes, you are sensing the AC magnetic field that is caused by AC currents. Here is a good intro to sniffer probe construction and use:

http://www.compliance-club.com/archi...ive/030718.htm

If you are not building the probe correctly, then you are sensing a mix of AC B & E fields, which is generally less useful.
mishima
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Sep12-13, 01:54 PM
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Nice, thank you for the very cool link. Currently my antenna is about 50 turns of wire on a wooden frame, those small sniffer probes would be very fun to build/use as well.

berkeman
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Sep12-13, 02:52 PM
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radiation pattern of crt tv with small loop antenna


Quote Quote by mishima View Post
Nice, thank you for the very cool link. Currently my antenna is about 50 turns of wire on a wooden frame, those small sniffer probes would be very fun to build/use as well.
The single-turn, E-field shielded B-field probes as shown in the article generally require a preamp of 20-40dB before the signal is visible on a spectrum analyzer. You might be able to E-field shield your multi-turn coil if you follow the overall tips in the paper. The E-field shielding is necessary to keep capacitively-coupled signals out of your probe signal.


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