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Audio frequency ranges?

by sherrellbc
Tags: audio, filter, frequency
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sherrellbc
#1
Mar19-13, 12:45 AM
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I am working on a small design project for class. I am making a simple frequency analyzer that essentially will multiplex a corresponding number of LEDs and turn a servo.

I realize that the audible range of the human ear is roughly 60 - 20k Hz. Within this spectrum, what ranges of frequencies is classified as low, mid-range, and high? I need to know approximately what the accepted ranges are in order to design my filters accordingly. If there really is not a set standard I suppose I could always improvise.

Thanks
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Bobbywhy
#2
Mar19-13, 04:37 AM
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For hundreds of examples of audio frequency classifications please see:
https://www.google.com/search?q=audi...w=1366&bih=660

Cheers, Bobbywhy
sophiecentaur
#3
Mar19-13, 04:53 PM
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Quote Quote by sherrellbc View Post
I am working on a small design project for class. I am making a simple frequency analyzer that essentially will multiplex a corresponding number of LEDs and turn a servo.

I realize that the audible range of the human ear is roughly 60 - 20k Hz. Within this spectrum, what ranges of frequencies is classified as low, mid-range, and high? I need to know approximately what the accepted ranges are in order to design my filters accordingly. If there really is not a set standard I suppose I could always improvise.

Thanks
Please remember that 'classification' never implies 'understanding'. So many students worry themselves sick when 'the names' appear to clash with reality; there is no need to. If in doubt, ask for clarification and some actual numbers because these divisions are always changing. Buzzwords are for salesmen and not for Engineers.

berkeman
#4
Mar19-13, 06:18 PM
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Audio frequency ranges?

Quote Quote by Bobbywhy View Post
For hundreds of examples of audio frequency classifications please see:
https://www.google.com/search?q=audi...w=1366&bih=660
Holy Cow!

Here is a reasonable tutorial that describes a number of sub-bands, and what goes on in them. You can probably decide how to divide your frequency bands based on the tutorial:

http://www.dplay.com/tutorial/bands/index.html

.
sophiecentaur
#5
Mar19-13, 06:49 PM
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It's still only stamp collecting, though.
jim hardy
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Mar19-13, 07:04 PM
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Try this site it lets you hear the frequency so you can classify them to suit your taste.

(it's really intended for us old guys to check our tinnitus)

http://www.audionotch.com/app/tune/
harborsparrow
#7
Mar21-13, 09:28 PM
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The old Bell system phone network was engineered to support 300 Hz to 3000 Hz for voice circuits. Over those old phone lines, you could hear music, but it sounded kind of cheesy.

Although some people can perceive musical tones as high as 20000 Hz, most can't. In today's world, many people have had their hearing reduced by noise pollution, so probably they can only perceive much lower frequencies than 20000.

You'd probably catch pretty good sound for most folks if you could allow for 300 to 10000 Hz.
jim hardy
#8
Mar21-13, 10:58 PM
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to my ear
low = below~160hz
mid = below about 800hz
high = above that
This comes from tinkering with an audio oscillator and speaker.

Type those into that link and see what your friends think...


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