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EE Topic: Relation between Temperature and Natural Frequency of an obj

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Said97
#1
Jul23-14, 12:21 PM
P: 1
Hi guys,

I am still new to this forum, so I hope I can learn many things from this forum :)

I am currently looking for my IB EE topic about the relation between temperature and natural frequency on an object.

I have been researching about this topic, however I don't find any specific formula nor theory relating temperature with the natural frequency of an object. The closest I got was the relation between stator natural frequency with the Young Modulus of the object. I have seen article that talk about the relation the Young Modulus and Temperature are related. What do you guys think about it? Will it work? or is there any theory that relates the temperature and natural frequency of an object?

Thank you so much.
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AlephZero
#2
Jul23-14, 05:30 PM
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Quote Quote by Said97 View Post
The closest I got was the relation between stator natural frequency with the Young Modulus of the object. I have seen article that talk about the relation the Young Modulus and Temperature are related.
That's the reason. The relation between Young's Modulus and temperature depends on the material, but almost always, E decreases as T increases.

There are other effects as well. For example in a musical instrument like a guitar, if the thermal expansion coefficient of the strings is different from the expansion coefficient of the instrument itself, the tension in the strings will vary with temperature and change the vibration frequency.

The speed of sound in air varies with temperature, and that affects the vibration frequency of the air in pipes, etc.

You could probably do some experiments on stringed and wind instruments yourself. Temperature changes of a few degrees C will give a measurable effect. Experimenting on "solid objects" would be harder to do, because you would need higher temperatures (e.g. up to a few hundred degrees C) to get large differences.
analogdesign
#3
Jul23-14, 05:47 PM
P: 535
Quote Quote by AlephZero View Post

You could probably do some experiments on stringed and wind instruments yourself. Temperature changes of a few degrees C will give a measurable effect. Experimenting on "solid objects" would be harder to do, because you would need higher temperatures (e.g. up to a few hundred degrees C) to get large differences.
What an awesome idea! It would make for a great science fair project.


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