Potential Iron Pill Overdose


by Vodkacannon
Tags: iron, overdose, pill, pills, potential, supplements, vitamins
Vodkacannon
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#1
Oct28-13, 12:50 PM
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I have seen that the recommended daily intake of iron for adults is 45 mg/day. I've seen even lower estimates. These iron pills that I bought contain 50 mg of iron and give 278% of your daily value intake. The instructions say take two tablets daily.

Isn't this a bit extreme or am I not getting something?
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Evo
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#2
Oct28-13, 01:12 PM
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Why are you taking iron supplements? Have you been tested as anemic and advised to take supplements by a doctor?

The recommended daily intake of iron for males age 19 to 50 years is only 8 mg. This is easily obtained from a balanced diet.

Who should be cautious about taking iron supplements?

Iron deficiency is uncommon among adult men and postmenopausal women. These individuals should only take iron supplements when prescribed by a physician because of their greater risk of iron overload. Iron overload is a condition in which excess iron is found in the blood and stored in organs such as the liver and heart.
The body excretes very little iron, please see a doctor. The upper limit for iron is 45mg per day, and again, such supplements should only be under a doctor's supervision when medically necessary. See table 5.

See table 3 http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iro...hProfessional/
SteamKing
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#3
Oct28-13, 01:24 PM
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A good leeching can get rid of excess iron.

SW VandeCarr
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#4
Oct28-13, 06:03 PM
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Potential Iron Pill Overdose


Quote Quote by SteamKing View Post
A good leeching can get rid of excess iron.
What do you mean by "leeching"? Do you mean chelation therapy?

http://www.aamds.org/node/114
SteamKing
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#5
Oct28-13, 07:03 PM
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No, I mean putting actual leeches on your body, like they used to do. Bloodsuckers, ya know.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leech

Leeches also produce a powerful natural anticoagulant. They were studied and used experimentally in the 1980s to aid in microsurgery used to reattach body parts. If you want to get rid of excess iron, take a couple of leeches and call your doctor in the morning.
SteamKing
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#6
Oct28-13, 07:07 PM
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Of course, if you don't like leeches, then you can get a phlebotomy (blood letting) on a regular basis.
SW VandeCarr
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#7
Oct28-13, 07:22 PM
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Quote Quote by SteamKing View Post
No, I mean putting actual leeches on your body, like they used to do. Bloodsuckers, ya know.
I thought you might mean that but was afraid to ask, not because it's bad (it's an approved treatment) but because I didn't know how you felt about such things.
SteamKing
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#8
Oct28-13, 08:43 PM
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They're leeches, you know. I can take 'em or leave 'em ... or leave 'em ... dang it ... or leave 'em.
Vodkacannon
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#9
Oct28-13, 10:08 PM
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Apparently, according to WebMD.com, the average person only absorbs 10% of ingested iron, while people with hemochromatosis can absorb up to 30%, which can cause iron poisoning.

I have poor diverse food intake and wake up groggy even after more than 8 hours of sleep. I can sleep for 12 hours sometimes. I figured that iron would lower my fatigue.
Evo
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#10
Oct28-13, 11:14 PM
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Quote Quote by Vodkacannon View Post
Apparently, according to WebMD.com, the average person only absorbs 10% of ingested iron, while people with hemochromatosis can absorb up to 30%, which can cause iron poisoning.

I have poor diverse food intake and wake up groggy even after more than 8 hours of sleep. I can sleep for 12 hours sometimes. I figured that iron would lower my fatigue.
Too much iron *causes* fatigue. Don't self diagnose, please get checked by a doctor.
strangerep
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#11
Oct29-13, 01:54 AM
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Quote Quote by Vodkacannon View Post
Apparently, according to WebMD.com, the average person only absorbs 10% of ingested iron, while people with hemochromatosis can absorb up to 30%, which can cause iron poisoning.

I have poor diverse food intake and wake up groggy even after more than 8 hours of sleep. I can sleep for 12 hours sometimes. I figured that iron would lower my fatigue.
Adding to what Evo said... if you need more encouragement to go see a doctor then read up a bit more about haemochromatosis:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haemochromatosis

Iron overload gradually causes damages to various other major organs (heart, liver, pancreas, to name a few).

(I'm not saying this is necessarily what's wrong with you -- there's lots of other things than could cause fatigue, e.g., liver cirrhosis if your username "Vodkacannon" indicates your actual drinking habits. You need to get a professional diagnosis sooner rather than later.)
Manish7
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#12
Nov5-13, 02:13 AM
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a chelating therapy would overall decrease the symptoms of iron toxicity Deferoxamine and now a new with very less side effects Deferasirox can be used.
note: all these are generic names.
strangerep
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#13
Nov6-13, 06:29 PM
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Quote Quote by Manish7 View Post
a chelating therapy would overall decrease the symptoms of iron toxicity Deferoxamine and now a new with very less side effects Deferasirox can be used.
According to Wikipedia, Deferasirox is not risk-free, and has a rather large question mark hanging over its use.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deferasirox
Quote Quote by Wikipedia
Risks (of Deferasirox):
Deferasirox was the #2 drug on the list of 'Most frequent suspected drugs in reported patient deaths' compiled by the Institute for Safe Medical Practices in 2009. There were 1320 deaths reported, perhaps explained by an update to the ADE data of Novartis, and a new boxed warning about gastrointestinal haemorrhage as well as kidney and liver failure.
See also: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deferoxamine

Chelation therapy in general sounds like something not to be undertaken lightly:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chelation_therapy
Evo
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#14
Nov6-13, 11:23 PM
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From what I've been reading, it appears that chelation therapy is the last resort.
Manish7
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#15
Nov8-13, 12:18 AM
P: 16
you have not focussed , that deferasirox is approved by FDA in 2005.also the symptoms of iron toxicity in acute condition like vomit.,diarrhoea,pain abdomen,coma are much more severe than its side efeects especially in developing countries but not in developed nations.
also note that deferoxamine causes nephrotoxicity as it is excreted in yrine but deferasirox is excreted in bile
so no chance of nephrotoxicity but it causes liver and gastric haemorrhage only in high doses administered !


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