Register to reply

Installing sensors to monitor current and rpm

by Crankshaft1983
Tags: current, installing, monitor, sensors
Share this thread:
Baluncore
#19
Jul2-14, 05:48 PM
Sci Advisor
Thanks
P: 1,887
Quote Quote by Crankshaft1983
So I was wondering if there is a way to pick those analog or digital signals from the inverter or the machine (machine technical manual attached) then route it through a DAQ to a computer for analysis.
Re: My post #17 attachment. Have you looked at page B33 of the 841 Technical Reference ?
I believe that should now have solved your problem.
Crankshaft1983
#20
Jul8-14, 10:25 AM
P: 11
Quote Quote by Baluncore View Post
Re: My post #17 attachment. Have you looked at page B33 of the 841 Technical Reference ?
I believe that should now have solved your problem.
Yes Sir, thanks much for all the help. Hopefully I can successfully get the data routed to my computer.
Well this is the main reason I'm hassling with this machine. Spindle current for the Z1 axis goes into
over-current mode when it reaches 12.1 amps or more causing it to burn wafers occasionally. The pre-set parameter value is set to 12. I don't know why this is happening but I figured monitoring the current while in operation over time might help shed some light. Any ideas why this is happening? or suggestions on what to check for or look into? Thank you
Baluncore
#21
Jul8-14, 12:59 PM
Sci Advisor
Thanks
P: 1,887
I assume you have checked all the obvious things such as coolant water flow and filters.

Grinding is a difficult process to automate because the abrasive wheel characteristics and feed rates play a big part in optimising performance. My first guess would be that the abrasive wheels now being used have a different composition than originally specified for the machine.

Documentation is for 2003, so the machine may be 10 years old. I would still consider contacting the manufacturer technical department. It is highly probable that they have regularly encountered this problem and can tell you exactly what causes it.

It is possible that vibration over time has resulted in an intermittent fault, starting to appear more often now, that upsets the parameter measurement or control feedback loop. That will often appear as connector contamination or cracked solder joints. You can usually test for it with a “technical tap” from a rubber headed hammer on the equipment frame. If it fails when tested with the hammer, be more gentle and use a smaller hammer as you progressively approach the sensitive component.

A machine operator can usually tell the health of a machine by the sound it makes while operating. Ask the operator what it usually sounds like when operating correctly. They will then listen to it more carefully and be able to better advise you when things change.
Crankshaft1983
#22
Jul9-14, 12:05 PM
P: 11
Quote Quote by Baluncore View Post
I assume you have checked all the obvious things such as coolant water flow and filters.

Grinding is a difficult process to automate because the abrasive wheel characteristics and feed rates play a big part in optimising performance. My first guess would be that the abrasive wheels now being used have a different composition than originally specified for the machine.

Documentation is for 2003, so the machine may be 10 years old. I would still consider contacting the manufacturer technical department. It is highly probable that they have regularly encountered this problem and can tell you exactly what causes it.

It is possible that vibration over time has resulted in an intermittent fault, starting to appear more often now, that upsets the parameter measurement or control feedback loop. That will often appear as connector contamination or cracked solder joints. You can usually test for it with a “technical tap” from a rubber headed hammer on the equipment frame. If it fails when tested with the hammer, be more gentle and use a smaller hammer as you progressively approach the sensitive component.

A machine operator can usually tell the health of a machine by the sound it makes while operating. Ask the operator what it usually sounds like when operating correctly. They will then listen to it more carefully and be able to better advise you when things change.
Quite a couple of things to look at. Thanks again Sir, you've been very helpful.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Fiber optic current sensors Advanced Physics Homework 5
Fiber optic current sensors Classical Physics 0
Current sensor needed to monitor solar cell while cell is being used. Electrical Engineering 11
Voltage/current in circuit with two temperature sensors Introductory Physics Homework 15
Installing new HD Computers 6